Cost Containment for Higher Education: Strategies for Public Policy and Institutional Administration

By William Brand Simpson | Go to book overview

5
Strategies Requiring General Acceptance

The possibilities for cost containment discussed in the present chapter are ones with respect to which it would be difficult for individual colleges or universities to take the initiative except as part of a general change in public attitudes and policy.


RESPECTABILITY OF INFORMAL LEARNING

Popular attitudes and public policy encourage individuals to undertake a structured formal postsecondary learning experience, whether academic or employment-related (vocational, professional), that leads to certification. Included within this category, in addition to conventional college and university attendance, is distance education with credit by examination. There is almost a fixation on formal postsecondary education as a desirable part of the life pattern for all individuals. However, such activities as travel, volunteer public service, reading and the use of libraries, self-directed study, attendance at museums and cultural events, on-the-job experience, and employerprovided training also assist an individual in gaining an appreciation of his or her context and the possibilities for personal and social change. These are currently regarded as supplementary to formal learning, and not as an alternative. Yet were there public recognition of the respectability of this alternative, and possibly some public financial support, many individuals who do not proceed to higher education would be encouraged to experience informal learning they might not

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