Marketing and Entrepreneurship: Research Ideas and Opportunities

By Gerald E. Hills | Go to book overview

Preface

This is the first scholarly book dedicated to the interface between marketing and entrepreneurship and to providing numerous research opportunities on truly important issues. At a time when the marketing discipline is increasingly criticized for too little attention to important topics, this book offers a path for the researcher who wants to make a major impact. This is a pioneering book and it is hoped that it will one day be viewed a classic contribution to marketing and to entrepreneurship though.

A spirit of entrepreneurship encompassed the conception and birth of this volume because it addresses a new and critically important subject area. The marketing discipline has, until recently, largely ignored entrepreneurship and new ventures. The growing entrepreneurship field has also devoted little attention to marketing.

Although there is considerable new knowledge in this volume, the primary focus is on questions, issues and variables that should stimulate added creativity. For the scholar, the sifting and sorting will be fruitful. The contents of this volume will be of value to the reader in search of ideas, concepts and research directions pertaining to marketing in new and/or growing ventures. The authors are leading scholars in the marketing and management disciplines.

The book begins with a rich collection of five articles on the nature of entrepreneurship and its relationship to marketing. This may be the single best array of definitional perspectives ever written, in part because leading contributors to the debate have returned to the task. The second section focuses on market opportunity, but rather than only look at market analysis and idea screening, there is also ground breaking work regarding entrepreneurial opportunity identification and opportunity recognition. Marketing strategy and each of the marketing mix areas are addressed in separate chapters with particular attention to the uniqueness of marketing in new enterprises as compared to mature, larger firms. The final section of the book may be the most

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