Marketing and Entrepreneurship: Research Ideas and Opportunities

By Gerald E. Hills | Go to book overview

10
Product/Service Development in New/Growing Firms

Robert D. Hisrich

Innovation is the key ingredient in new venture creation and economic development in today's hypercompetitive environment. Even though innovation is so important, the United States is becoming less innovative. For the first time ever, in 1986, more U.S. patents were granted to foreigners than U.S. citizens. One of the reasons innovation is such a key variable is the entrepreneur--the individual who is able to champion the innovation into the market place. This entrepreneur, and those that manage firms with fewer than 100 employees, create 80 percent of all new jobs and produce two and one-half times as many innovations as large firms per employee. These firms bring innovations to the market more quickly despite significant problems, particularly in finance and marketing.


IMPORTANCE OF RESEARCH INTERFACE

One of these problems, marketing, can be thought of in two ways--from a social perspective or a managerial perspective ( Hunt 1986). From the managerial perspective, marketing is "the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas, goods, and services to create exchanges that satisfy individual and organizational objectives" ( Board of Directors, American Marketing Association 1985). Although taking into account the social perspective, this definition focuses more on the managerial aspect of marketing, which is the aspect more closely related to entrepreneurship.

Entrepreneurship is an even more confusing term with a multitude of definitions being advanced from an economic, psychological, and business perspective. To the economist, an entrepreneur is one who brings assets such as resources, labor, and materials into a new combination of greater value than existed before. To the psychologist, an entrepreneur is a person driven by such

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Marketing and Entrepreneurship: Research Ideas and Opportunities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 332

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.