The Republican Dilemma: Conservatism or Progressivism

By Conrad Joyner | Go to book overview

TAFT, DEWEY, AND VANDENBERG

As soon as Roosevelt was elected in 1936 the Republicans began the search for a presidential candidate. Numerous men were mentioned. But there were three who were continuously thought of as presidential timber and who survived the preliminary weeding out. The three men who emerged in the latter half of 1939 were Senator Robert Taft, District Attorney Thomas Dewey, and Senator Arthur Vandenberg. All had qualifications which were brought to the attention of the people.

Alice Roosevelt Longworth, Teddy Roosevelt's daughter, in an article, "What's the Matter With Bob Taft?" in the May 4, 1940 issue of The Saturday Evening Post, seems to have captured much of Taft's appeal when she explained that "I am for Bob Taft because I do not yearn any longer for the man who is always on his toes, waving his hat, raising his voice, raring to go here, there, anywhere." Alice Longworth was certainly right when she said that Bob Taft was not ready to "go here, there, anywhere." If there ever was a man who was consciously aware of every political move he made, it was Bob Taft. He started the "right" political way by working as a precinct committeeman in his home town, Cincinnati, Ohio. After a year's service in this lowly position he was elected to the Ohio State House of Representatives and served as speaker and floor leader. Eight years of hard work and loyal service to the party enabled him to move up to the Ohio Senate. After only one term in the Senate, Taft became a victim of the 1932 Roosevelt land- slide. During his tenure as a state legislator he devoted himself to the task of straightening out Ohio's state and municipal borrowing programs and fast gained the reputation as a hard man with the dollar.

Ohio Republicans were proud of Bob Traft, and in 1939 he was their favorite son candidate for the Republican presidential nomination. In 1938, after winning a hard fight from Judge Arthur Day in the United States senatorial primary he defeated the Democratic nominee, Robert

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Republican Dilemma: Conservatism or Progressivism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • 1940 · the Republican Travail 1
  • Taft, Dewey, and Vandenberg 9
  • The Immortal Amateur 31
  • We Want Willkie" 49
  • Why They Wanted Willkie 63
  • The Decades of Accommodation: 1940-60 71
  • The Republican Dilemma 87
  • I N D E X 100
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 104

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.