Aunt Jemima, Uncle Ben, and Rastus: Blacks in Advertising, Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

By Marilyn Kern-Foxworth | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

On September 29, 1967, I stood on a dock in Annapolis, Maryland, where my great-great-great-great-grandfather had been taken ashore two hundred years earlier on September 29, 1767. It was one of the moments when I truly realized the importance of knowing one's history and the importance of documenting every facet of that history. Because for a long period of time it was against the law to teach slaves to read and write, much of black American history had to be documented by people other than blacks. As a result, much of our history has either been lost or severely distorted. Now that we have moved into a new era, there are many more opportunities for black Americans, and more and more books have been written that document the black experience. I am proud to say this is one of those books which offers a collection of information that is long overdue and chronicles the history of blacks in a critical area that has been previously underrecorded -- advertising.

Advertising is an integral part of our lives, and we are constantly besieged by someone or some company urging us to buy this or that. It has been no secret that blacks in America have not been portrayed justly and fairly in advertising during the past decades. And the images of America's blacks perpetuated by advertising have not averaged very favorable. It is important for us to realize what effects such depictions have had on black people's self-respect, self-esteem, self-concept, and self-identity. We can't deny the importance of advertising and public relations in our lives as they are definitely a reality of human existence. I like the saying, "If you do not deal with what is truly the reality, then you can be certain that down the line

-ix-

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Aunt Jemima, Uncle Ben, and Rastus: Blacks in Advertising, Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • References xxi
  • Chapter 1 - Slave Advertisements: A Mirror to the "Peculiar Institution" 1
  • Notes 25
  • References 26
  • Chapter 2 - Memories of the Way We Were: Blacks in Early Print and Electronic Advertising 29
  • Notes 41
  • References 41
  • Chapter 3 - Myths, Lies, and Stereotypes: Black Advertising Symbols, Characters, and Models 43
  • References 58
  • Chapter 4 - Aunt Jemia: The Most Battered` Woman in America Rises to the Top 61
  • Appendix: Chronology of Important Dates in the History of Aunt Jemima 107
  • Notes 108
  • References 109
  • Chapter 5 Invisible Consumers: Gaining Equal Representation for Blacks in Advertising 115
  • Notes 127
  • References 127
  • Chapter 6 - Separate and Definitely Not Equal: Frequency of Blacks in Advertising 131
  • Notes 146
  • References 146
  • Chapter 7 - Blacks in Advertising: Critics Give Two Thumbs Up 149
  • Notes 163
  • References 164
  • Chapter 8 - Epilogue: Colorizing Advertising: a 21st-Century Challenge 167
  • Notes 172
  • References 172
  • Appendix: African-American Museums and Resource Centers 175
  • Selected Bibliography 183
  • Index 191
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