Aunt Jemima, Uncle Ben, and Rastus: Blacks in Advertising, Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

By Marilyn Kern-Foxworth | Go to book overview
has begun a national campaign for a Washington-based Monument to the Slaves to be much like the Vietnam Memorial.

The National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center, located in Wilberforce, Ohio, sponsored a 1992 exhibit entitled "Before Freedom Came: African-American Life in the Antebellum South," the most comprehensive ever organized on the topic of slavery. Coordinated by the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, it reflected virtually every aspect of African-Americans' life in the South from 1790 to 1865: the work they did, what they owned, their relationships among themselves and with whites, the ways in which slaves resisted the system and participated in the Civil War. A 219-page catalog, fully illustrated and annotated, contained essays by scholars in history, material culture, folklore, and archeology. For more information, call 1-800- BLK-HIST.


REFERENCES

Adler Mortimer J., ed. 1969. The Negro in American History. Slaves and Masters 1567-1854. Chicago: Encyclopedia Britannica.

Algerna Lathan Windley. 1974. A Profile of Runaway Slaves in Virginia and South Carolina from 1730 through 1787. Ph.D. diss., University of Iowa.

Beifuss John. 1990. "Organizers Say Study of Slavery Benefits All". Commercial (Tenn.) Appeal, July 7.

Bergman Peter M. 1969. The Chronological History of the Negro in America. New York: New American Library.

Blassingame John W. 1979. The Slave Community. Plantation Life in the Antebellum South. New York: Oxford University Press.

Bradley Patricia. 1987. Slave Advertising in the Colonial Newspapers: Mirror to the Dilemma. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, San Antonio, Texas, August 1-4.

Brasch Walter M. 1981. Black English and the Mass Media. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

Cary Lorene. 1992. "Why It's Not Just Paranoia: An American History of 'Plans' for Blacks". Newsweek, April 6, p. 23.

Cole Johnnetta. 1978. "Militant Black Women in Early U.S. History". Black Scholar (December): 38-44.

Coleman J. Winston. 1940. Slavery Times in Kentucky. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

Curtin Philip D. 1969. The Atlantic Slave Trade: A Census. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.

Douglass Frederick. 1983. Life and Times of Frederick Douglass. Reprint. Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press.

Everett Susanne. 1978. History of Slavery. London: Magna Books, 1978.

Fleming John. 1992. "NAAMCC to Host Major Slavery Exhibit". National Afro- American Museum and Cultural Center Newsletter 3 ( Spring).

Fox-Genovese Elizabeth. 1988. Within the Plantation Household: Black and White Women of the Old South. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

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Aunt Jemima, Uncle Ben, and Rastus: Blacks in Advertising, Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • References xxi
  • Chapter 1 - Slave Advertisements: A Mirror to the "Peculiar Institution" 1
  • Notes 25
  • References 26
  • Chapter 2 - Memories of the Way We Were: Blacks in Early Print and Electronic Advertising 29
  • Notes 41
  • References 41
  • Chapter 3 - Myths, Lies, and Stereotypes: Black Advertising Symbols, Characters, and Models 43
  • References 58
  • Chapter 4 - Aunt Jemia: The Most Battered` Woman in America Rises to the Top 61
  • Appendix: Chronology of Important Dates in the History of Aunt Jemima 107
  • Notes 108
  • References 109
  • Chapter 5 Invisible Consumers: Gaining Equal Representation for Blacks in Advertising 115
  • Notes 127
  • References 127
  • Chapter 6 - Separate and Definitely Not Equal: Frequency of Blacks in Advertising 131
  • Notes 146
  • References 146
  • Chapter 7 - Blacks in Advertising: Critics Give Two Thumbs Up 149
  • Notes 163
  • References 164
  • Chapter 8 - Epilogue: Colorizing Advertising: a 21st-Century Challenge 167
  • Notes 172
  • References 172
  • Appendix: African-American Museums and Resource Centers 175
  • Selected Bibliography 183
  • Index 191
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