Kinship and Marriage in a New Guinea Village

By H. Ian Hogbin | Go to book overview

9
Supporting a Family

CONSIDERATION must now be given to the way in which married men organize their various tasks. I shall begin with agriculture.

Taro, the staple, is not a seasonal crop, and planting goes on more or less continuously. Each person prepares a new area every couple of months and in a two-year period makes about a dozen gardens. The probability is that six of these will be located on the territory of his own lineage, two on that of his father's lineage, and the remainder on that of the lineages of some of his other cognates and affines. Only if he still lives near his father is the proportion likely to be much different. In these circumstances the number on his own lineage lands and that on his father's lineage lands may be reversed.

Lineage members, once they have reached a decision about which fresh patch of ground is to be cleared, indicate to a few of their kinsmen that any who care to join in will be sure of a welcome and the offer of a plot. On a given occasion one man may be accompanied by a son and a brother-in- law, a second by his father and father-in-law, a third by a paternal uncle and a son-in-law, and so on. An identical procedure is followed next time except that some of the guests will be changed. The man who earlier chose a son and a brother-in-law, for example, now perhaps prefers a remote cousin and a son-in-law, and the one who chose his father and father-in- law perhaps a paternal uncle and a wife's sister's husband. Such hospitality is reciprocated, and the relatives whom a man brings to his own lineage territory return the compliment by taking him to theirs. Accordingly, when a working party sets off the lineage members are in the minority. The rest, who may make up two-thirds of the total, include such people as fathers, grandfathers, father's brothers, father's brothers' sons, father's sisters' sons, mother's brothers' sons, sons, grandsons, remote cousins, fathers-in-law, sons-in-law, and wife's sisters' husbands.

The lineage leader makes the announcement of the day on which clearing is to begin, though often he acts less on his own initiative than at the prompting of his fellows. Hosts and guests then proceed to cut down the larger trees. They leave the timber for a few weeks to dry out and eventually burn it.

Each man now says how much ground he needs, having in mind his own household and any other families that look to him for help or to which he

-138-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Kinship and Marriage in a New Guinea Village
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • London School of Economics Monographs on Social Anthropology ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Contents viii
  • I - The Setting 1
  • 2 - Kin and Community 13
  • 3 - Kinship Terms 38
  • 4 - Birth and Early Childhood 53
  • 5 - Later Childhood and Adolescence 72
  • 6 - Awakening of the Sexual Impulses 94
  • 7 - Marriage 103
  • 8 - Husband and Wife 124
  • 9 - Supporting a Family 138
  • I0 - Fulfilling Obligations 154
  • II - The Last Years 164
  • References 171
  • Index 174
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 182

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.