American Art Colonies, 1850-1930: A Historical Guide to America's Original Art Colonies and Their Artists

By Steve Shipp | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
East Hampton Art Colony

At East Hampton, near the sea end of Long Island, them is a true artist colony, and perhaps the most popular of adjacent sketching-grounds for New York artists.

Lizzie W. Champney

East Hampton, near the eastern end of Long Island, became a popular destination for artists following a momentous sketching trip to the area in 1878 by members of the Tile Club, an association of New York City artists "who met informally to paint decorative tiles and exchange thoughts about the art world."1 Their sketches and paintings of East Hampton soon attracted other artists to the area, seeking subject matter that often found a ready market through art galleries and among patrons.

One of the first articles making an impact for both artists and tourists was "The Tile Club at Play," published in Scribner's Monthly in February 1879. Writer W. MacKay Laffan said members of the Tile Club arrived at East Hampton on a June afternoon to find that "the town consisted of a single street, and the street was a lawn . . . set with tapering poplar trees [and] bordered on either side of its broad expanse by ancestral cottages."2 Laffan quoted one member, identified by his Tile Club nickname of "the Gaul," as saying: "My wig! I must secure a sketch of some of this!"3 While in East Hampton, the group of visiting artists gathered at the former home of the late poet-composer John Howard Payne and sang a moving rendition of his famous song "Home, Sweet Home."4

-31-

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American Art Colonies, 1850-1930: A Historical Guide to America's Original Art Colonies and Their Artists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Notes 1
  • Chapter 2 Cornish Art Colony 11
  • Notes 17
  • Chapter 3 Cos Cob Art Colony 19
  • Notes 23
  • Chapter 4 Cragsmoor Art Colony 25
  • Notes 28
  • Chapter 5 East Hampton Art Colony 31
  • Notes 36
  • Chapter 6 Gloucester-Rockport Art Colony 37
  • Chapter 7 Laguna Beach Art Colony 43
  • Notes 46
  • Chapter 8 Lawrence Park Art Colony 49
  • Notes 53
  • Chapter 9 New Hope Art Colony 55
  • Notes 61
  • Chapter 10 North Conway Art Colony 63
  • Notes 69
  • Chapter 11 Old Lyme Art Colony 71
  • Notes 80
  • Chapter 12 Provincetown Art Colony 83
  • Chapter 13 Santa Barbara Art Colony 93
  • Notes 96
  • Chapter 14 Santa Fe Art Colony 97
  • Chapter 15 Taos Art Colony 109
  • Chapter 16 Woodstock Art Colony 123
  • Notes 128
  • Bibliography 129
  • Index 139
  • About the Author 161
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