Bylines in Despair: Herbert Hoover, the Great Depression, and the U.S. News Media

By Louis W. Liebovich | Go to book overview

6
Radio, Newsreels, Newspapers, and the Presidency

Unable to reconcile his differences with hostile White House correspondents, President Hoover faced a serious communications problem in 1931. As the months passed, Hoover was swept further away from the voters and into a public relations disaster. He needed to change his communications tactics, but he was too stubborn and self-righteous, and his presidency lost its momentum. What he failed to recognize was that new opportunities for communication were emerging all around him. These new media might give him a better opportunity to recapture the admiration that the public had always lavished upon him.

The most obvious new ways to reach the voters in the second half of the Hoover presidency were radio and sound newsreels. These two media were employed effectively from 1933 to 1945 by Franklin D. Roosevelt, who also wanted to circumvent caustic editors and publishers. In 1931 with a reelection campaign drawing near and the need for positive imagery obvious, why did Hoover not pursue the same course? The answer lies not only in his inflexibility but also in the development of both radio and newsreel technology.

Radio had cultivated a vast audience by 1931, but mostly the airwaves were filled with advertising and entertainment. News programming was crude and largely confined to local spot stories, live transmission of

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bylines in Despair: Herbert Hoover, the Great Depression, and the U.S. News Media
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Prologue xi
  • Note xv
  • 1 - The Unlikely Road to Success 1
  • Notes 20
  • 2 - Secretary of Commerce 29
  • Notes 50
  • 3 - The Campaign and Aftermath of the 1928 Election 57
  • Notes 76
  • 4 - Lost Opportunities 83
  • Notes 97
  • 5 - The Crash 101
  • Notes 125
  • 6 - Radio, Newsreels, Newspapers, and the Presidency 131
  • Notes 150
  • 7 - The Bonus March 155
  • Notes 177
  • 8 - The Dawn of the Roosevelt Era 183
  • Notes 203
  • Epilogue 209
  • Note 211
  • Selected Bibliography 213
  • Index 217
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.