Bylines in Despair: Herbert Hoover, the Great Depression, and the U.S. News Media

By Louis W. Liebovich | Go to book overview

provide direct federal aid to business and local governments. The RFC came into being in January 1932 with a $1.5 billion budget and by March had loaned hundreds of millions of dollars to ailing banks, insurance companies, and other institutions. Bank failures slowed from 346 in January to 46 in April. 97

Enraged conservatives felt Hoover had abandoned his ideals. Many less conservative congressmen, who were being bombarded with pleas for help from their home districts, felt that only direct relief to individuals would provide adequate relief and reassure the public. Hoover could not go that far. It was his feeling that aid to businesses would prime the pump and would provide enough additional funding to revive the economy, while putting people back to work. But basically recipients of the government loans paid off their debts and refused to spend more or to hire more. The RFC, the most extraordinarily populist step in Hoover's career, had little or no impact. Public unrest grew daily.

By the spring of 1932, the situation had grown desperate, and special interest groups clamored for the president's and Congress's attention. Many middle-class and poor people had reached the end of their resources. They were destitute, hungry, and desperate. They had somehow expected someone somewhere to save them, and in three years no one had stepped forward. What they read in their newspapers and magazines, and what they heard and saw on radio and in newsreels did not reassure them. They complained that the president had failed them, and they began to associate the Great Humanitarian with the inhumanity of hunger and homelessness. One such group decided in early spring 1932 to take matters into their own hands, and so would begin a series of events that would tarnish the president's name forever.


NOTES
1.
Erik Barnouw, A Tower in Babel. A History of Broadcasting in the United States, vol. 1 ( New York: Oxford, 1966), pp. 223-24.
3.
Ibid., pp. 250-51. See also "Appendix F -- Radio Addresses by the President", Public Papers of the Presidents: Herbert Hoover 1932-1933, pp. 1277-88.
4.
David Lawrence oral history interview with Raymond Henle, director of the Herbert Hoover oral history project, Sarasota, Fla., Feb. 14, 1967, p. 23, Oral History Files, HHPL.
5.
"Radio Firm Denies Barring Priest, Critic of Hoover: He Quits Talks", New York Herald Tribune, Jan. 5, 1931. See also Alan Brinkley, Voices of Protest. Huey Long, Father Coughlin, and the Great Depression ( New York: Knopf, 1982), p. 100.
6.
John F. Roche, "Kaltenborn Views Radio As Menace", Editor & Publisher, 62, no. 38 ( Feb. 8, 1930), p. 9.
7.
"Bickel on Radio", Editor & Publisher, 63, no. 24 ( Nov. 1, 1930), p. 34;

-150-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bylines in Despair: Herbert Hoover, the Great Depression, and the U.S. News Media
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Prologue xi
  • Note xv
  • 1 - The Unlikely Road to Success 1
  • Notes 20
  • 2 - Secretary of Commerce 29
  • Notes 50
  • 3 - The Campaign and Aftermath of the 1928 Election 57
  • Notes 76
  • 4 - Lost Opportunities 83
  • Notes 97
  • 5 - The Crash 101
  • Notes 125
  • 6 - Radio, Newsreels, Newspapers, and the Presidency 131
  • Notes 150
  • 7 - The Bonus March 155
  • Notes 177
  • 8 - The Dawn of the Roosevelt Era 183
  • Notes 203
  • Epilogue 209
  • Note 211
  • Selected Bibliography 213
  • Index 217
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.