Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Documentary History

By Timothy Walch; Dwight M. Miller | Go to book overview

11
Loyal Opposition

Throughout the last thirty years of his life, Herbert Hoover remained unalterably opposed to Franklin Roosevelt and everything that he stood for. Efforts on Roosevelt's part to bridge the chasm between himself and Hoover were met with silence from Hoover. The Hoovers were invited to at least two social occasions at the White House and both invitations were refused. Efforts by Eleanor Roosevelt to acquire a portrait of Mrs. Hoover to hang in the White House were thwarted by Mrs. Hoover. Neither Hoover would have anything to do with the President and First Lady.

Perhaps the most telling evidence of Hoover's opposition to Roosevelt was the former president's refusal of the president's request for assistance with food relief in Europe in the years before the United States entered the war. It is the only time in his life that Herbert Hoover ever refused a direct request for assistance from a president of the United States. Hoover had helped Wilson, Harding and Coolidge before his presidency. And later in life, he would help Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson. But not Roosevelt; not ever. The anger was too deep.

Roosevelt had approached Hoover about taking on the role of food relief administrator. There was no one else in the world with as much experience with famine relief, and those in need were the small countries of Europe whose people so revered Hoover. But Hoover refused two official emissaries from the White House in September of 1939. Hoover would later refer to his food relief work

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Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1 - Comrades in Arms 1
  • 2 - Partisan Politics 23
  • 3 - Calm Before the Storm 39
  • 4 - A Bitter Campaign 51
  • 5 - Cooperation or Conflict 69
  • 6 - Crisis Before Christmas 87
  • 7 - Shuttle Diplomacy 99
  • 8 - Face to Face 113
  • 9 - End of Our String 129
  • 10 - Political Intrigue 149
  • 11 - Loyal Opposition 169
  • 12 - War Years 189
  • Conclusion My Personal Relationship with Mr. Roosevelt 209
  • Further Reading and Research 213
  • Index 217
  • About the Editors 223
  • Recent Titles in Contributions in American History 224
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