Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Documentary History

By Timothy Walch; Dwight M. Miller | Go to book overview

Further Reading and Research

The story of the extraordinary rivalry between Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt has yet to be written. Glimpses of their friendship and conflicts over twenty-seven years can be found in a handful of memoirs and in a number of scholarly articles by historians and political scientists. Below is a selection of the publications that have appeared to date.

Berle Adolf A. Navigating the Rapids, 1918-1971. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1973.

Best Gary Dean. "Herbert Hoover, 1933-1941: A Reassessment," in Herbert Hoover Reassessed. Mark O. Hatfield, ed. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1981, pp. 227-273.

-----. Herbert Hoover: The Post Presidential Years, 1933-1964, 2 vols. Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 1983.

Burner David. Herbert Hoover: A Public Life. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1979.

Cole Wayne S. Roosevelt and the Isolationists. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1983.

Freidel Frank. Franklin D. Roosevelt: Launching the New Deal. Boston: Little, Brown, 1973.

-----. "Hoover and FDR: Reminiscent Reflections," in Understanding Herbert Hoover: Ten Perspectives. Lee Nash, ed. Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 1987, pp. 128-140.

-----. "Hoover and Roosevelt and Historical Continuity," in Herbert Hoover Reassessed. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1981, pp. 275-291.

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Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Documentary History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1 - Comrades in Arms 1
  • 2 - Partisan Politics 23
  • 3 - Calm Before the Storm 39
  • 4 - A Bitter Campaign 51
  • 5 - Cooperation or Conflict 69
  • 6 - Crisis Before Christmas 87
  • 7 - Shuttle Diplomacy 99
  • 8 - Face to Face 113
  • 9 - End of Our String 129
  • 10 - Political Intrigue 149
  • 11 - Loyal Opposition 169
  • 12 - War Years 189
  • Conclusion My Personal Relationship with Mr. Roosevelt 209
  • Further Reading and Research 213
  • Index 217
  • About the Editors 223
  • Recent Titles in Contributions in American History 224
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