Othello: A Guide to the Play

By Joan Lord Hall | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY

The following survey, which does not attempt to provide an exhaustive bibliography of Othello, outlines important critical work on the play, emphasizing books over articles. Readers who would like to pursue in detail topics treated in this book, such as the role of Iago or the play in performance, are encouraged to take their lead from the notes at the end of the relevant chapter.

Virginia Mason Vaughan and Margaret Lael Mikesell have compiled a comprehensive bibliography of publications on Othello up to 1990 in Othello: An Annotated Bibliography ( New York and London: Garland Publishing, Inc., 1990). Shakespeare Studies, Shakespeare Survey, and Shakespeare Quarterly contain excellent articles on Othello and reviews of significant productions and filmed versions of the play; a selection from Shakespeare Survey is reprinted in Kenneth Muir and Philip Edwards (eds.), Aspects of Othello ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977). Among the many critical works on Shakespeare's tragedies that contain illuminating sections on Othello, I can single out only a few for special mention: Norman Rabkin, Shakespeare and the Common Understanding ( New York: Free Press, 1967), on the conflict between reason and faith in the drama; Rosalie Colie, Shakespeare's Living Art ( Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1974), on "Othello and the Problematics of Love"; Graham Bradshaw , Misrepresentations: Shakespeare and the Materialists ( London and Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1993), which fences with ideologists' views of Othello; and Everybody's Shakespeare (Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1993), in which Maynard Mack astutely reminds us of the sense of "irretrievable loss" that the play conveys (p. 132).


THE TEXT: DIFFERENT EDITIONS

The textual authority of the two versions of Othello -- the Quarto (Q) of 1622 and the play as it appears in the Folio (F) of 1623 -- is discussed in Chapter 1.

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Othello: A Guide to the Play
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes x
  • Journal Abbreviations xi
  • 1 - Textual History 1
  • Notes 8
  • 2 - Contexts and Sources 11
  • Notes 22
  • 3 - Dramatic Structure 29
  • Notes 57
  • 4 - The Major Characters 63
  • Notes 94
  • 5 - Themes 103
  • Notes 116
  • 6 - Critical Approaches 121
  • Notes 142
  • 7 - The Play in Performance 151
  • Notes 200
  • Bibliographical Essay 209
  • Index 217
  • About the Author *
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