Sex/Gender Outsiders, Hate Speech, and Freedom of Expression: Can They Say That about Me?

By Martha T. Zingo | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book would not have been possible without the support and assistance of numerous individuals whose help was invaluable. Most notably, my thanks are extended to: William Macauley (Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, Oakland University) and Vincent Khopoya (Chair, Department of Political Science, Oakland University), for the financial support they made available during the 1996 winter term; Barbara Somerville (librarian, Kresge Library, Oakland University) for processing numerous interlibrary loan requests and for persistently tracking down necessary materials; Zhanya Poske (editorial assistant); and Linda Luke (student researcher), Sean Kosfosky (student assistant), Kevin Coxe (research assistant), and Karen Meyers (secretary, Department of Political Science, Oakland University), for essential research and clerical work. Special thanks is also due to all of the staff at Praeger Publishers for making this project a reality, especially James T. Sabin, Leanne Jisonna, David Palmer, and Jason Azze.

On a more personal note, the following individuals were very important in ways only family can understand: Pasquale A. Zingo, Margaret Bachofen, Mary Emery, Michele Baray, Marie Gula, Marcie Bonsall, Michael Zingo, Nora Klimist, Saul Wineman, and Marilyn Wineman. Honor is also paid to the memory of Elizabeth H. Zingo and Ruth R. Zingo. A special debt of gratitude is owed Cyddie -- for poetry, healing energy, and vision; Martha -- for listening, believing, and helping me to stay focused and to

-xi-

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Sex/Gender Outsiders, Hate Speech, and Freedom of Expression: Can They Say That about Me?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 - Social and Legal Condition of "Outsiders" 1
  • Notes 7
  • Chapter 2 - Free Speech and the Hate Speech Controversy 17
  • Notes 42
  • Chapter 3 - Equality Jurisprudence and Suspect Classifications 51
  • Notes 82
  • Chapter 4 - Speech, Hate, and (non-) Discrimination 101
  • Notes 127
  • Chapter 5 - Judicial Response to Hate Regulations 139
  • Notes 168
  • Chapter 6 - Conclusion 177
  • Notes 181
  • Bibliography 183
  • Index 211
  • About the Author *
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