Expanding the Frontiers: Superpower Intervention in the Cold War

By Karen A. Feste | Go to book overview

FOUR
Cold War Origins: The Civil War in Greece

In the late 1940s, wartime unity and cooperation among the allied forces broke down into coalition divisions of the Cold War, with the superpowers competing for international support. It happened succinctly, on Greek soil. New lines were established for determining the status quo through victory and defeat in the context of influence and accommodation between the Greek forces and their counterpart supporting party, be it the Americans or the Soviets. I low were Cold War operating rules established by the superpower intervention strategies in the Greek Civil War?


THEORETIC OVERVIEW

Following the analysis in chapter 3 of the historical overview of U.S. and Soviet intervention trends through the four decades of the Cold War, comparing justifications for intervention as a foreign policy strategy for dominant countries, the situation in Greece at the end of World War II represents the ideal case for examining the onset of the superpower rivalry dimensions and operating norms. First, the domestic unrest in the country that had reached sharp internal political divisions, coupled with high levels of violence, presented a clear situation for outside parties to offer assistance. The intervention opportunity was strong. Second, in geopolitical terms, the land of Greece, Situated on the edge of the European southern frontier, was technically unclaimed territory, unlike the countries of East and West Europe, which had already been secured into respective superpower camps as a result of the war outcome. Third, the ideological divisions within the country mirrored the doctrinal differences between the superpowers. On the one end were Royalist forces supported by a strong British connection, on the other,

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