Citizen Espionage: Studies in Trust and Betrayal

By Theodore R. Sarbin; Ralph M. Carney et al. | Go to book overview

4 Models of Espionage
Carson Eoyang
INTRODUCTION
Espionage is perhaps the most familiar and least understood crime against the state. From Nathan Hale through Mata Hari to Kim Philby, spies -- both heroic and villainous -- have been popular subjects of public interest and curiosity ( Knightley, 1986; Dulles, 1982). Yet despite this long-standing fascination, we are largely incapable of predicting who will commit espionage, controlling what motivates spies, and anticipating when betrayal of our nation's secrets is most likely.Consider the following events in the history of espionage in America over the last decade.
Item : In the spring of 1987, six Marine Corps embassy guards were arrested for compromising national security. Sergeant Clayton Lonetree was subsequently convicted of illegal fraternization with a Soviet seductress and committing espionage on behalf of the KGB ( Committee of State Security) ( Allen and Polmar, 1988).
Item : The National Security Agency (NSA) has testified that the costs of changing communication techniques and computer equipment to recover from the information compromised by the former NSA employee Ronald Pelton is estimated to be on the order of $400 million ( Engelberg, 1986).
Item : It is believed that several human intelligence sources in Moscow were identified and subsequently executed because of disclosures by

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Citizen Espionage: Studies in Trust and Betrayal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Enemy Within: a Social History of Treason 19
  • Notes 38
  • 3 - A History of Recent American Espionage 39
  • Notes 66
  • 4: Models of Espionage 69
  • 5 - The Mask of Integrity 93
  • 6 - Criminological Approach to Security Violations 107
  • Notes 125
  • 7 - Trade Secret Theft as an Analogue to Treason 127
  • 8 - The Temptations of Espionage: Self-Control and Social Control 143
  • 9 - Work Organizations as Contexts for Trust and Betrayal 163
  • Notes 187
  • References 189
  • Index 203
  • About the Contributors 211
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