Citizen Espionage: Studies in Trust and Betrayal

By Theodore R. Sarbin; Ralph M. Carney et al. | Go to book overview

necessarily the organization, who may be victimized by violations of such personal trust. In addition, no matter how irrational such acts may seem, we can only wonder how many crimes or other transgressions against organizations were precipitated by unredressed breaches of personal trust between individual members.

Trust and betrayal in work settings are vital and fascinating concerns, worthy of much greater attention than they have been given here. But they are also slippery ideas, needing greater precision in definition and more tractability to observation and measurement. Progress may not be easy, for as Shapiro ( 1990) has pointed out: "Abuses of trust are hard to detect, offending is collective, victimization subtle, offenses ongoing, culpability difficult to assign, conclusive evidence hard to amass, [and] harsh sanctions spill over onto innocent parties" (p. 359).

Let's proceed in spite of this.


NOTES
1.
It is difficult to conceive of trust as a meaningful notion in situations where objective guarantees prevail and there is no chance of unfavorable futures. When we throw tokens into an automated highway toll booth, we "trust" that our contribution will reach the relevant official treasury account. It is a very different sense of trust we experience at our last glimpse of consciousness before undergoing the surgeon's knife for a quadruple coronary artery bypass.
2.
It is also important to recognize that we exclude the treatment of trust in relationships that are commonly termed friendships or intimacies (see, e.g., Jones, 1989; Baier, 1989; as diverse examples of this fascinating aspect of trust and related ideas). Although friendships and intimacies are common to most work settings, a discussion of trust in these distinctive relationships is beyond the scope of this chapter.
3.
The level of identification with the work group (or broader organization) may also have implications for the effectiveness of these social units in helping a member cope with the consequences of interpersonal trust violations (see, e.g., House, 1981).
4.
We note again that we exclude criminal acts or transgressions punishable by law (e.g., breaches of formal employment contracts or labor law violations) from ourdiscussion.

-187-

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Citizen Espionage: Studies in Trust and Betrayal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Enemy Within: a Social History of Treason 19
  • Notes 38
  • 3 - A History of Recent American Espionage 39
  • Notes 66
  • 4: Models of Espionage 69
  • 5 - The Mask of Integrity 93
  • 6 - Criminological Approach to Security Violations 107
  • Notes 125
  • 7 - Trade Secret Theft as an Analogue to Treason 127
  • 8 - The Temptations of Espionage: Self-Control and Social Control 143
  • 9 - Work Organizations as Contexts for Trust and Betrayal 163
  • Notes 187
  • References 189
  • Index 203
  • About the Contributors 211
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