Dwight D. Eisenhower: Soldier, President, Statesman

By Joann P. Krieg | Go to book overview

6
Dwight D. Eisenhower and Civil Rights Conservatism

Robert F. Burk

The decades since World War II have witnessed the resurgence of civil rights issues as central concerns on the American political agenda. In recent years, a bipartisan consensus has been reached on the legitimacy of black demands for equal citizenship rights and on the nation's need to project an image of racial democracy. Even in the formerly Jim Crow South, overt expressions of white supremacy have lost their political respectability and legitimacy. Hidden behind this consensus on general principles, however, are sharp ideological differences over the means and the proper pace of minority advance. The modern civil rights debate centers on the appropriate role and powers of the federal government in regulating the racial behavior of private citizens, and in pressing for an integrated society as a necessary condition for genuine racial equality.

In contrast to modern liberals, who have advocated accelerated government action to confront both officially sanctioned and private forms of segregation and discrimination, conservatives have argued that the dangers of federal "coercion" and "statism" outweigh the benefits of a larger federal role in the racial field. The rise of this postwar conservative approach to racial issues, which has jettisoned Jim Crow and has incorporated a limited advocacy of civil rights within a general philosophy of lifting governmental restraints on private citizens, can be traced to the presidency of Dwight D. Eisenhower. From his central position of national leadership, Eisenhower offered an approach to racial issues which criticizes both the traditional official racism of the South and the newer tradition of government intervention in the private sector symbolized by the New Deal. Eisenhower's civil rights philosophy stemmed from a combination of his pre-presidential racial experiences, his evolving views on the role of the federal government, and the partisan needs of his adopted Republican party. His approach to racial issues sought the removal of official sanctions mandating discrimination, but left ad-

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dwight D. Eisenhower: Soldier, President, Statesman
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 370

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.