Dwight D. Eisenhower: Soldier, President, Statesman

By Joann P. Krieg | Go to book overview

15
Eisenhower, Churchill, and the "Balance of Terror"

John Kentleton

In June 1954, in his eightieth year, Winston Churchill visited the United States for the last time as British Prime Minister for talks with President Eisenhower. His doctor had no doubts as to what drove him: "To hold off the threat of war until it is no longer worth while for anyone to break the peace--that is the only thing left to him now, his one consuming purpose. Without it there is little meaning in life. In his heart he has a great fear: he dreads another war, for he does not believe that England could survive. " As Churchill himself confided to Lord Moran, "My thoughts are almost entirely thermonuclear. I spend a lot of time thinking over deterrents."1

Eisenhower and Churchill had first met briefly in the White House at the time of the so-called Second Washington Conference in June 1942 and, if their subsequent written accounts are to be believed, both men were immediately taken with each other. 2 While Eisenhower had been a relatively obscure Army officer until the coming of the war, Churchill, of course, had been a world figure for more than a quarter of a century. Indeed, in his casual reminiscences published during his retirement, At Ease, subtitled "Stories I Tell to Friends," Eisenhower claims to have heard about Churchill from two British officers in 1918 while Commandant of an Army camp at Gettysburg, receiving delivery of some tanks, a weapon Churchill had had a hand in producing: "he sounded like a good chap."3 Genuine intimacy had developed in the course of the war, both in North Africa and especially in London. In one of his last letters to President Roosevelt, Churchill had paid a glowing tribute: "I wish to place on record the complete confidence felt by His Majesty's Government in General Eisenhower, our pleasure that our armies are serving under his command, and our admiration of the great and shining qualities of character and personality which he has proved himself to possess in all the difficulties of handling an Alliance command."4 For

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dwight D. Eisenhower: Soldier, President, Statesman
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 370

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.