Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

A

ABEL, IORWITH WILBER. I. W. Abel was born August 11, 1908, in Magnolia, Ohio. After graduating from high school and attending a local business college, Abel got a job as a molder. In 1936, he enthusiastically supported the formation of the Congress of Industrial Organizations and the "Little Steel" strike of 1937. He rose steadily through the ranks of the United Steelworkers of America, becoming its national secretary-treasurer in 1952. In 1965, Abel successfully unseated David J. McDonald as president of the United Steelworkers. He earned a reputation as an enlightened labor leader who worked for racial equality, industrial stability, and union democracy. A lifelong Democrat, Abel was a consistent voice in support of liberal social and economic policies. He stepped down as head of the United Steelworkers in 1977. I. W. Abel died August 10, 1987.

REFERENCES: John Herling, Right to Challenge: People and Power in the Steelworkers, 1977; New York Times, August 11, 1987.

ABERNATHY, RALPH DAVID. Ralph David Abernathy was born March 11, 1926, in Linden, Alabama. He graduated from Alabama State College in 1950 and earned a master's degree at Atlanta University in 1951. Abernathy then entered the ministry. During the great struggles of the civil rights movement* of the late 1950s and 1960s, he was a trusted friend, confidant, and assistant to Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.,* in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference* (SCLC). Abernathy was also a national civil rights leader in his own right. When King was assassinated in April 1968, the mantle of the SCLC fell on Abernathy. At the time of his death, King was working in support of the garbage collectors of Memphis, Tennessee, who had gone on strike for better wages and working conditions. Abernathy brought the strike to a successful conclusion for the workers and then went on to complete the Poor People's

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 554

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.