Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

C

CABARET . Cabaret was a highly successful Broadway play of the 1960s. Premiering at the Broadhurst Theater in New York on November 20, 1966, Cabaret was adapted from Christopher Isherwood's Berlin Stories and the play I Am a Camera by Joe Masteroff. The music was by John Kander, and the lyrics by Fred Ebb. Cabaret starred Joel Grey as the master of ceremonies. A musical set in a cabaret in late Weimar Germany just before the Nazi takeover, Cabaret exposed the decadent racism and anti-Semitism of German society. It was sophisticated, dark, and frightening, a complete departure from the Rogers and Hammerstein musicals that had dominated Broadway for so long. Cabaret eventually had a run of 1,165 performances.

REFERENCE: Kurt Ganzl, The Encyclopedia of the Musical Theater, 1994.

CALLEY, WILLIAM LAWS, JR. William L. Calley, Jr., was born June 8, 1943, and grew up in Miami, Florida. After graduating from high school he worked a number of odd jobs before joining the U.S. Army in 1966. He completed officer's candidate school and was assigned to Company C of the 1st Battalion of the 20th Infantry. At the time the unit was stationed in Hawaii. Company commander Captain Ernest Medina* put Calley in charge of the 1st Platoon. They arrived in South Vietnam in December 1967 and deployed to Quang Ngai Province, where they were assigned to the 11th Infantry Brigade.

On March 16, 1968, during an operation in the village of My Lai,* Company C slaughtered nearly 500 Vietnamese civilians without encountering any Vietcong* resistance. A helicopter pilot observing the operation reported large-scale civilian casualties, but officers of the 11th Infantry Brigade--ColonelOran K. Henderson and Major General Samuel W. Foster--conducted only a cursory investigation and concluded that nothing out of the ordinary had taken place at My Lai.

Over the course of the next year, rumors about the massacre circulated within

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Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
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