Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

F

FAIL SAFE. Fail Safe was a chilling film of the early 1960s that captured the prevailing fear of nuclear conflict in the United States during the post-Cuban missile crisis* heyday of the Cold War.* Released in 1964, Fail Safe was directed by Sidney Lumet and based on the book by Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler. It starred Henry Fonda, Walter Matthau, Dan O'Herlihy, and Frank Overton. A taught, frightening drama, Fail Safe deals with the possibility of the system's failing. A nuclear bomb-armed American B-52 mistakenly crosses its "fail-safe" line--the point at which it either returns home or penetrates Soviet air space and initiates its bombing run--and heads for Moscow. The United States is unable to recall the plane, and the aircraft drops its bombload on Moscow. The only way to prove that the bombing is an unintentional mistake and prevent a thermonuclear holocaust is for the president of the United States ( Henry Fonda) to have U.S. bombers incinerate New York City with a nuclear weapon.

REFERENCE: New York Times, September 16, 1964.

FALL, BERNARD. Author of the Viet Minh Regime ( 1956), Le Viet Minh, 1945-1960 ( 1960), Street without Joy ( 1961), The Two Viet Nams ( 1963), Viet Nam Witness ( 1966), Hell in a Very Small Place ( 1966), and Last Reflections on a War ( 1967) and editor with Marcus Raskin of The Viet Nam Reader ( 1967), Bernard Fall was a recognized authority on Vietnam and the wars fought there. Born in 1926, Fall served in World War II with the French underground until the liberation and then with the French army until 1946. He was a research analyst at the Nuremberg War Crimes Tribunal and worked for the United Nations in the International Tracing Service. He came to the United States in 1951 on a Fulbright Scholarship, earning an M.A. and Ph.D. in political science at Syracuse University. He first went to Vietnam in 1953 to do research for his doctorate and returned for the sixth time on a Guggenheim Fellowship. When

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Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
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