Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

G

GALBRAITH, JOHN KENNETH. John Kenneth Galbraith was born near Ontario, Canada, October 15, 1908. In 1931, he graduated from the University of Tornoto, specializing in economics, after which he earned a Ph.D. at the University of California at Berkeley. He spent his entire career at Harvard, except for two years at Princeton ( 1939-1940), four years in Washington, D.C., as a government economist ( 1941-1945), and three years as ambassador to India ( 1961-1963). A Keynesian economist who urged the federal government to manage the economy through spending and taxation policies, he gained near celebrity status in 1958 with his bestselling book The Affluent Society, a critique of consumer culture and poverty in America. A prolific writer, his other books include American Capitalism ( 1952), The Great Crash ( 1955), The New Industrial State ( 1967), Economics, Peace, and Laughter ( 1971), and The Age of Uncertainty ( 1977).

During the 1960s, Galbraith served as an economic advisor to Presidents John Kennedy* and Lyndon Johnson.* From that vantage point, he urged them to make the government an instrument of macroeconomic policy. He also pushed both presidents to be more proactive on civil rights. As for the Vietnam War,* he was an early opponent who realized that a military solution to a political problem would never work. He told Kennedy to avoid escalating the war, and he urged Johnson to withdraw U.S. troops. Since leaving politics and retiring from Harvard, Galbraith has continued to write and advocate, ever faithful to his liberal interpretation of politics and economics. His most recent books include Capitalism, Communism, and Coexistence ( 1988), The Culture of Contentment ( 1992), and The Good Society: The Humane Agenda ( 1996). In 1998, at the age of ninety, Galbraith was still writing and being interviewed.

REFERENCE: John Kenneth Galbraith, A Life in Our Times, 1981.

GARCÍA, HÉCTOR PEREZ. Héctor Perez García was born January 17, 1914, in rural Tamualipas, Mexico. Fleeing the Mexican revolution, his family came

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Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
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