Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

H

HAIR. Hair was an extraordinarily popular tribal-rock musical of the late 1960s and 1970s. It was written by Gerome Ragni and James Rado, with music by Galt MacDermot. Hair opened originally at the Anspacher Theater in New York on October 17, 1967, and a revised version premiered at the Biltmore Theater on April 29, 1968. Basically, Hair was a celebration of the values of the hippie,* "make-love-not war"* generation of the 1960s. Members of the group "Hair" are a hedonistic bunch who want a life without responsibilities or rules. Sex, drugs, and doing anything one wants whenever one wants are the group's values. Hair eventually had a run of 1,742 performances and became the Broadway version of the 1960s counterculture.

REFERENCE: Kurt Ganzl, The Encyclopedia of the Musical Theater, 1994.

HALBERSTAM, DAVID. David Halberstam was born in New York City in 1934. He graduated from Harvard in 1956. Determined to become a journalist, and blessed with an engaging writing style and fertile mind, he joined the staff of the New York Times in 1960. He soon found himself working as a war correspondent in South Vietnam, covering the deepening involvement of the United States there. At first he agreed with the U.S. military commitment, accepting the policy rhetoric that South Vietnam had to be saved from Communist aggression. But he soon realized that the regime of President Ngo Dinh Diem* of South Vietnam was hopelessly corrupt and that most South Vietnamese identified more closely with Ho Chi Minh,* leader of North Vietnam and Communist forces. The most powerful force in South Vietnam, Halberstam concluded, was nationalism, not communism, and most Vietnamese wanted to be rid of foreigners, including Americans. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1964 for his reporting. Halberstam left South Vietnam in 1964 and wrote The Making of a Quagmire: America and Vietnam During the Kennedy Era, which was published in 1965. The book predicted a continuing deterioriaton of the U.S. political position in

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Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
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