Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

P

PANTY HOSE . Du Pont began marketing the first nylons in 1940, and in 1959 Glen Raven Mills, a North Carolina textile firm, introduced Panti-Legs, the first panty hose. The company simply stitched existing nylon stockings to a large nylon crotch. The first version came in ten sizes, hardly enough to satisfy a mass market, but they were also clumsy and hard to keep form-fitting. During the early 1960s, new versions were greatly improved. Seams were eliminated, and the new panty hose fitted much better. They also came in dozens of sizes. Women purchased panty hose with enthusiasm because the product eliminated the need for garter belts. In 1970, Hanes Company introduced L'eggs, panty hose packaged in a plastic container and available in supermarkets and convenience stores.

REFERENCE: Jane Stern and Michael Stern, Encyclopedia of Pop Culture, 1992.

PARIS PEACE TALKS . On May 13, 1968, after three years of heavy combat, the United States, North Vietnam, South Vietnam, and the Vietcong began meeting in Paris to discuss a negotiated settlement of the war. The talks were less than productive. North Vietnam was not about to be deterred from its goal of unifying both Vietnams under communist control and steadfastly refused to agree to a withdrawal of their troops from South Vietnam. South Vietnam knew that "unification" was a euphemism for its own destruction. The parties spent months arguing over the size and shape of the table that they would eventually sit around once negotiations began. The United States, even after policymakers realized that Vietnam was not worth such an enormous American investment, refused to budge out of fear that the Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China would interpret compromise as weakness.

During the Richard Nixon* administration, national security adviser Henry Kissinger* began conducting secret negotiations with North Vietnam. By 1971, the United States was tired of the war and ready to compromise, and both Nixon

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Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
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