Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

R

RABBIT, RUN. Rabbit, Run is the title of John Updike's most famous bestselling novel. Published in 1960, Rabbit, Run featured Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom, an army veteran who finds himself trapped in a nameless working-class town of the 1950s. In an age when the American Dream supposedly embraced family, religion, and the pursuit of happiness, Rabbit cannot find happiness. All he can think of are earlier days when he had fewer responsibilities and more freedom. His wife is an alcoholic, and he is caught in a dead-end job. In a desperate and ultimately futile attempt to recapture that sense of personal liberation, Rabbit abandons his pregnant wife and runs off with another woman. Although Rabbit eventually returns to his wife, she unwittingly kills their baby daughter in a drunken stupor. The message of Rabbit, Run stood in sharp contrast to the dominant ethology of the 1950s.

REFERENCE: John Updike, Rabbit, Run, 1960.

RABBITS . During the Vietnam War,* the term "rabbits" was used by African- American soldiers* to refer to white soldiers.

REFERENCE: James S. Olson, ed., Dictionary of the Vietnam War, 1988.

RAMPARTS . During the 1960s and early 1970s, Ramparts was the premier New Left * magazine in the United States. It was founded in San Francisco in 1962. Under Warren Hinckle's brilliant leadership, Ramparts went from a circulation of 4,000 in 1964 to 250,000 in 1968. It peaked in 1968, however, and entered a long period of decline. By late in 1969, circulation was down to 125,000, and financial problems plagued the journal. Still, it was a major voice in support of the civil rights movement* and against the Vietnam War.* By the mid- 1970s, many of Ramparts most important contributors--such as Eldridge Cleaver,* David Horowitz, and Pete Collier--began turning more conservative.

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Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
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