Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

S

SAIGON . Saigon, today known as Ho Chi Minh City, was the capital of the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) from 1954 to 1975. It is located approximately forty-five miles up the Ben Nghe River from the South China Sea.

REFERENCE: Virginia Thompson, French Indochina, 1968.

SALINGER, J. D. Jerome David Salinger was born in New York City January 1, 1919. He graduated from Valley Forge Military Academy in 1936 after being expelled from several preparatory schools and went on to attend New York University, Ursinus College, and Columbia University. At Columbia, he published his first short work of fiction in Story, an influential periodical founded by his writing instructor, Whit Burnett. Salinger's short works soon began appearing in Esquire, Collier's, The Saturday Evening Post, and most notably, The New Yorker. During the 1940s, he published "I'm Crazy" and "Slight Rebellion of Madison," both of which introduced Holden Caulfield, the future narrator of The Catcher in the Rye.

Salinger is most famous for this controversial novel about the odyssey of teenage misfit and prep school dropout Holden Caulfield, a curious, self-critical, and compassionate moral idealist whose attitudes are controlled by a rigid hatred of hypocrisy. Catcher in the Rye is hilariously irreverent, a sarcastic critique of every established institution imaginable. During the late 1950s and throughout the 1960s, Catcher in the Rye became required reading in thousands of high school and college American-literature courses, influencing the thinking of millions of young American readers. Holden Caulfield became an antihero--a symbolic icon for a decade in which rejection of parents, church, military, and country became the rite of passage for an entire generation of educated young people. The organization, humor, and theme in The Catcher in the Rye all make it one of the most influential novels in American literary history. It created a pop culture icon that outlasted the age in which it was written, a fan club that

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Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
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