Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

T

TANANA-YUKON DENA' NENA' HENASH . Established in June 1962, Tan- ana-Yukon Dena' Nena' Henash (Our Land Speaks) was a group of Athabascan chiefs from central Alaska. An early leader was Charles Ryan, one of the Metlakatla people. They first met to protest Alaskan state restrictions on their traditional hunting rights. The Statehood Act of 1958 had supposedly guaranteed those rights, but the law also permitted state authorities to open up 102 million acres of Athabascan land to public domain access. The Athabascan chiefs campaigned to make sure that land near their villages was not designated as part of that public domain and that they retained all hunting, fishing, and mineral rights there. The organization also demanded improved federal health care programs, escrow accounts for Indian oil and gas revenues, and economic training for young people. Most of their demands were achieved in the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971.

REFERENCES: Robert D. Arnold, Alaska Native Land Claims, 1978; David S. Case, Alaska Natives and American Laws, 1984; Armand S. La Potin, Native American Voluntary Organizations, 1986.

THE TATE-LABIANCA MURDERS . Early Saturday morning, August 9, 1969, actress Sharon Tate, who was eight months pregnant, Jay Sebring, Abigail Folger, Voytek Frykowski, and Steven Earl Parent were brutally murdered in the Los Angeles home of Tate and her husband, film director Roman Polanski. The next morning, Leon and Rosemary LaBianca were killed at their home. In both murders, the victims were tortured, repeatedly stabbed, shot, beaten, and hanged. The words "Pig," "Rise," and "Helter Skelter" were smeared on the walls in the victims' blood.

Charles Manson and four members of his cultlike hippie* "family" were charged with their murders. Manson (aka Jesus Christ, God, the Devil, Soul, Charles Willis Manson) was tried along with Susan Atkins (aka Sadie) and

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Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
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