Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

W

WAGON TRAIN. Wagon Train was one of the most popular western dramas in television* history. Included in its cast were Ward Bond as Major Seth Adams, Robert Horton as Flint McCullough, Terry Wilson as Bill Hawks, and Frank McGrath as Charlie Wooster. Its setting was the trail from St. Joseph, Missouri, to California in the 1860s, before the completion of the transcontinental railroad, and the weekly programming revolved around the dangers-- Indians, cutthroats, deserts, snakes, and mountains--that members of the wagon train faced during their cross-country journey. NBC first broadcast the series on September 18, 1957, and produced Wagon Train until 1962, when ABC took over. The last episode was broadcast on September 5, 1965.

REFERENCE: Tim Brooks and Earle Marsh, The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows, 1995.

WALLACE, GEORGE CORLEY. George C. Wallace was born August 25, 1919, in Clio, Alabama. His father was a farmer. Wallace grew up in Clio and then worked his way through the University of Alabama. He received a law degree there in 1942 and then joined the U.S. Army for the duration of World War II. In 1946 and 1947, he served as an assistant attorney general of Alabama, and he won a seat in the state legislature in 1947. There he earned a reputation as somewhat of a liberal for denouncing the Ku Klux Klan and as a definite populist. Reelected three times, Wallace served there until 1953, when he accepted appointment as a state circuit judge. He lost a bid for the governorship of Alabama in 1958, largely because he offered moderate enough views on racial issues to earn the endorsement of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). He vowed never to let race defeat him again. Wallace practiced law for the next four years in Clanton, Alabama. In 1963, he was elected to the state's highest office. His campaign theme was "Segregation now! Segregation tomorrow! Segregation forever!"

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Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
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