Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

Y

YIPPIES . See YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY.

YOUNG, WHITNEY M., JR . Whitney M. Young, Jr., was born in Lincoln Ridge, Kentucky, in 1922. He received his undergraduate degree from Kentucky State College in 1941. In 1947, Young earned his M.S.W. from the University of Minnesota and began his career as a social worker. In 1954, he was appointed dean of the school of social work at Atlanta University. Young was still holding that position when he was appointed president of the National Urban League in 1961.

Young's tenure as head of the National Urban League was a difficult one. The National Urban League's primary focus was the creation of jobs for black people, and Young worked closely with white business and political leaders to achieve that objective. Naturally, his rhetoric was based on interracial cooperation. But in the black power* atmosphere of the late 1960s, Young seemed too accommodationist to black militants, who often called him an "Uncle Tom." Young spoke eloquently about the need for civil rights, but he also believed passionately that black success could be achieved only within the existing social and economic system. Whitney Young died in 1971 during a trip to Africa.

REFERENCE: Nancy J. Weiss, Whitney M. Young, Jr., and the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1989.

YOUNG AMERICANS FOR FREEDOM . The Young Americans for Freedom was founded in Sharon, Connecticut, in 1960 to promote a conservative political agenda in the United States. Its leader was William F. Buckley, Jr.,* and in their so-called Sharon Statement, they called for downsizing of the federal government, laissez-faire economics, libertarian social policies, and a tough foreign policy stance toward the Soviet Union. During the 1960s, the Young Americans for Freedom grew substantially among white, middle-class, and

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Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
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