Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

Z

ZAP . In the 1960s, the term "zap" emerged in the hippie* counterculture* as a slang expression for victory or the elimination of an enemy or an obnoxious entity or idea.

REFERENCE: Ruth Bronsteen, The Hippy's Handbook--How to Live on Love, 1967.

ZAPRUDER FILM . On the morning of November 22, 1963, Abraham Zapruder went to Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Texas, to get a glimpse of President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy* during their visit to the city. He brought along a cheap, handheld home movie camera to record the event. A black Lincoln convertible carded the President and First Lady. As the car turned left at the Texas School Book Depository Building, Zapruder pushed the button on the camera and began filming the motorcade. But at precisely 12:30 P.M., shots rang out, and Zapruder eyewitnessed and recorded what happened. President Kennedy was shot in the head and neck by a hidden assassin. He was pronounced dead at 1:00 P.M.

As the shooting took place, Zapruder screamed again and again, "They killed him! They killed him!" The Zapruder film proved to be the only camera footage taken of the Kennedy assassination* and served as an important piece of primary evidence in the Warren Commission's investigation of the tragedy.

REFERENCE: Gerald L. Posner, Case Closed, 1994.

ZHOU ENLAI . Zhou Enlai was born in China in 1896. When he was a student in France in 1921, he joined the Communist Party. Three years later, he returned to China and joined Sun Yat-sen's Kuomintang reform movement. Zhou barely escaped several years later when Jiang Jieshi ( Chiang Kai-shek*) purged all Communists from the Kuomintang. He became a close friend and associate of Mao Zedong,* whom Zhou believed was a brilliant theorist and just the man to lead China's peasant masses in insurrection. Always a faithful follower of Mao, Zhou played a leading role in the Chinese Revolution of 1949, which expelled

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Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
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