Historical Dictionary of the 1960s

By Samuel Freeman; James S. Olson | Go to book overview

Selected Bibliography

AFRICAN AMERICANS

Anderson Alan B., and George W. Picketing. Confronting the Color Line: The Broken Promise of the Civil Rights Movement in Chicago. 1986.

Barnes Catherine A. Journey from Jim Crow: The Desegregation of Southern Transit. 1983.

Bartley Numan V. The Rise of Massive Resistance: Race and Politics in the South during the 1950s. 1969.

Beifuss Joan Turner. At the River I Stand: Memphis, the 1968 Strike, and Martin Luther King. 1989.

Belfrage Sally. Freedom Summer. 1965.

Blumberg Rhoda Lois. Civil Rights: The 1960s Freedom Struggle. 1991.

Branch Taylor. Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-63. 1988.

Brooks Thomas R. Walls Come Tumbling Down: A History of the Civil Rights Movement, 1940-1970. 1974.

Cagin Seth, and Philip Dray. We Are Not Afraid: The Story of Godman, Schwerner, and Chaney and the Civil Rights Campaign in Mississippi. 1988.

Carson Clayborne. In Struggle: SNCC and the Black Awakening of the 1960s. 1981.

Chafe William. Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom. 1980.

Clark E. Culpepper. The Schoolhouse Door: Segregation's Last Stand at the University of Alabama. 1993.

Cleaver Eldridge. Soul on Ice. 1968.

David Jay, and Elaine Crane, eds. The Black Soldier: From the American Revolution to Vietnam. 1971.

Dittmer John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. 1994.

Eissen-Udom E. U. Black Nationalism: A Search for an Identity in America. 1962.

Fairclough Adam. "To Redeem the Soul of America: The Southern Christian Leadership Conference from King to the 1980s". 1987.

Fisher Randall M. Rhetoric and American Democracy: Black Protest through Vietnam Dissent. 1985.

-507-

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Historical Dictionary of the 1960s
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 35
  • C 83
  • D 125
  • E 145
  • F 161
  • G 184
  • H 212
  • I 239
  • J 246
  • K 254
  • L 272
  • M 284
  • N 317
  • O 347
  • P 359
  • Q 378
  • R 379
  • S 402
  • T 437
  • U 455
  • V 460
  • W 470
  • X 487
  • Y 488
  • Z 490
  • Chronology of the 1960s 493
  • Selected Bibliography 507
  • Index 527
  • About the Contributors 545
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