U.S. Department of State: A Reference History

By Elmer Plischke | Go to book overview

Glossary of Diplomatic Terms

Accession Process whereby a nonsignatory state becomes a party to a treaty or agreement that has already been concluded by other states, which is authenticated by an instrument of accession. Usually the treaty or agreement text specifies whether a nonsignatory state is entitled to accede and how to file the instrument of accession. Also see Adhesion.

Accord When used generically, means an agreement, convention, pact, or treaty. At times is used more precisely to denote such instruments other than treaties and conventions.

Ad referendum Principle applied to the negotiation of treaties and agreements, which recognizes that the final instruments are subject to subsequent approval by the governments of the signatories -- in the case of the United States, by the President, and for a treaty, with the advice and consent of the Senate.

Adhesion Process whereby a state signifies its intention to abide by the stipulations of a treaty or agreement that has already been concluded by other states, which is authenticated by an instrument of adhesion. Some hold that such action does not signify that the state technically becomes a party to the treaty or agreement. Also referred to as adherence. Also see Accession.

Adjudication System of peaceful settlement of international disputes, in which parties submit their controversy to a court, which decides the case on the basis of principles of law and equity, the parties agreeing in advance to be bound by the court's decision. Also see Judicial Settlement and Arbitration.

Agréation Process of consultation of governments to arrive at an agreement respecting the appointment of a particular individual to serve as the diplomatic envoy of the sending government in the receiving country. Also see Agrément.

Agreement Generically used synonymously with accord, arrangement, joint declaration, or understanding but may be less formal than a treaty. In a narrower sense it

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