Groups, Teams, and Social Interaction: Theories and Applications

By A. Paul Hare | Go to book overview

5
Managing Conflict

Methods of managing conflict are the same as those for effective problem solving. If a problem had been solved effectively in the first place, there would be no need for a consultant or other mediator to introduce new methods in the second place. Since most of the conflicts that are of concern to team builders involve interpersonal problems, the ideal conflict resolution method will turn out to be one of using the method of consensus.

First we will note the suggestions made by some of the persons involved in team building for the resolution of conflict and then compare the suggestions with a sample of the literature on negotiation and mediation. The chapter closes with the description of a flow chart for the steps in the creative resolution of conflict.

Dyer ( 1987:115-118) suggests that a useful way to understand conflict is to view it as a violation of expectations. People have expectations about what is to be done, when it is to be done, and how it is to be done. They may have agreed on the what, but find they disagree on the when or how. Dyer's solution is to turn the disagreement into a problem-solving situation that requires the warring factions to try to work out solutions rather than spend time finding fault, placing blame, or looking for causes. One should avoid ignoring the disagreement, smoothing feelings even though an agreement has not been reached, and forcing an agreement, which may lead to public compliance but private resistance.

Francis and Young observe that a team that practices effective interpersonal problem solving combines both confrontation and care for individual viewpoints. Listening skills are especially important ( 1979:76). How to confront a team member during a critique is a skill that may need to be learned. Criticism of another person may be withheld because of politeness, fear of "loss of face," a disinclination to "rock the boat," or inadequate skills ( 1979:96). When the conflict is between groups or teams, Francis and

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Groups, Teams, and Social Interaction: Theories and Applications
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments iv
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Part I - Groups and Teams 1
  • 1 - Basic Concepts 3
  • 2 - Characteristics of Groups and Teams 15
  • Note 21
  • 3 - Group and Team Development 23
  • 4 - Problem Solving and Consensus 31
  • Note 43
  • 5 - Managing Conflict 45
  • 6 - Consultation: Diagnosis and Planning 53
  • Notes 64
  • 7 - Team Building with Symlog 65
  • Part II - Theories of Social Interaction and Applications 89
  • 8 - Functional Analysis 91
  • 9 - Dramaturgical Analysis: Intergrop Relations in Israel 97
  • 10 - Exchange Analysis 113
  • 11 - Symlog Analysis 125
  • 12 - Combined Analysis: Conformity and Creativity in Negotiations 143
  • Notes 155
  • References 157
  • Name Index 171
  • Subject Index 177
  • About the Author 178
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 178

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.