Moral Education for Americans

By Robert D. Heslep | Go to book overview

1
A Dire Need for Moral Education

This inquiry invites classroom teachers, school administrators, parents, clergy, policy makers, philosophers, and all other interested parties to join me in conceiving a moral education for Americans. The conception is to have a theoretical framework containing a set of moral norms and a view of the end, content, and pedagogy of education resting on that set of norms. The norms, I hope, will be feasible for the United States as well as logically sound. The view of moral education is to be applied to American education in a broad way. For the sake of further practical clarification, the view will be applied also to cases of individual Americans facing moral difficulties.

Certain individuals have already contributed to this project. They are, among others, my colleagues Carl Glickman and Duncan Waite, my one- time graduate research assistants Peggy Geren and Steven Smith, and the students of my Spring 1994 class in Ethics and Education. It is not possible, however, for many people to join me in this project in a strict sense. I am the one actually conducting the project, and few are present to talk with me about the work as it proceeds. Nevertheless, people may cooperate in a looser sense of the term. What I have in mind is a dialogue at a distance. In developing the theory of concern, I will use the published literature relevant to moral education as a basis for anticipating questions and objections that other people presumably would raise if they were present. Moreover, readers can inform me and discuss among themselves whether or not all of their questions and criticisms have been addressed, and whether or not those discussed were resolved satisfactorily. I will attempt to prevent my prejudices from distorting the investi

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Moral Education for Americans
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - A Dire Need for Moral Education 5
  • Notes 23
  • 2 - The Norms of Moral Agency 26
  • Notes 42
  • 3 - The Feasibility of the Norms 45
  • Notes 61
  • 4 - The Goal of Moral Education 64
  • Notes 73
  • 5 - The Content of Moral Education 75
  • Notes 94
  • 6 - The Pedagogy of Moral Education 96
  • Notes 118
  • 7 - Moral Education for the United States 120
  • Notes 140
  • 8 - Moral Education for Natalene Turner 143
  • Conclusions 164
  • 9 - Moral Education for the Force 168
  • 10 - Implications 194
  • Selected Bibliography 213
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 219
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