Moral Education for Americans

By Robert D. Heslep | Go to book overview

tion in pleasure, and hopefulness; an inclination to acquire and develop new interests; and a tendency to learn new styles of learning. Nevertheless, there are habits especially good for students of moral education. They may be grouped according to the virtues of moral agency.

With respect to the affective virtues, students of moral education need to be mannerly, friendly, willing to share interests, sympathetic, empathetic, charitable, and willing to sacrifice. Not only will these habits prepare students of moral education to gain other affective virtues, they also will help them to get along with one another as students and prospective moral agents and with their teachers and other adults as well. In addition, these habits will reinforce the other dispositions they need in order to learn the intellectual moral virtues. With respect to being able to learn moral reasoning, students must like being truthful; and they must like to gain knowledge. They need to be disposed to set goals for themselves individually and to understand them. They have to be inclined to identify and understand each other's purposes. They must have a tendency to identify and weigh different ways for attaining given goals. And they need to understand the superiority of the moral.


NOTES
1.
For an analysis of the concept of teaching, see Robert D. Heslep, The Mental in Education: A Philosophical Study (University, AL: The University of Alabama Press, 1981), pp. 118-121.
2.
Leon M. Lessinger, Every Kid a Winner: Accountability in Education ( New York: Simon & Schuster, 1970).
3.
Thomas F. Green, The Activities of Teaching ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1971).
4.
Unfortunately, those who in the 1970s debated the choice between Knowledge-Based Teacher Education and Performance-Based Teacher Education did not understand this lesson. Both knowledge and performance are needed in preservice teacher education, but neither one by itself nor both together will abolish the gap between preparation and practice. See Stanley Elam, Performance- Based Teacher Education: What Is the State of the Art? ( Washington, DC: American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, 1972). See also Heslep , The Mental in Education, pp. 134-136.
5.
Teresa M. Bey and Charles T. Holmes, eds., Mentoring: Contemporary Principles and Issues ( Reston, VA: Association of Teacher Educators, 1992).
6.
Mario D. Fantini and Gerald Weinstein, "Making Contact with the Disadvantaged," in Radical School Reform, edited by Ronald and Beatrice Gross ( New York: Simon & Schuster, 1969), p. 173. See also Anthony S. Dallmann- Jones and the Black River Group, The Expert Educator: A Reference Manual of Teaching Strategies for Quality Education ( Fond du Lac, WI: Three Blue Herons Publishing, Inc., 1993), Part II: Learning Styles.
7.
Some views on the moral dimensions of effective teaching appear in F. K. Oser , A. Dick, and J. Patry, eds., Effective and Responsible Teaching: The NewSynthesis

-118-

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Moral Education for Americans
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - A Dire Need for Moral Education 5
  • Notes 23
  • 2 - The Norms of Moral Agency 26
  • Notes 42
  • 3 - The Feasibility of the Norms 45
  • Notes 61
  • 4 - The Goal of Moral Education 64
  • Notes 73
  • 5 - The Content of Moral Education 75
  • Notes 94
  • 6 - The Pedagogy of Moral Education 96
  • Notes 118
  • 7 - Moral Education for the United States 120
  • Notes 140
  • 8 - Moral Education for Natalene Turner 143
  • Conclusions 164
  • 9 - Moral Education for the Force 168
  • 10 - Implications 194
  • Selected Bibliography 213
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 219
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