The American Banking Community and New Deal Banking Reforms, 1933-1935

By Helen M. Burns | Go to book overview

national crisis. Bankers as a group offered few remedies for the critical economic situation of which they were so vital a part. Too close to their own local problems, few bankers were able to achieve an overall view of banking conditions. Those who did were voices crying in the wilderness. Because of their inability to evolve a unified plan of action to correct banking abuses, bankers were unprepared to cope with the declining situation. It is not surprising then that they made few positive contributions to the bank reform legislation enacted during the first hundred days of the Roosevelt administration.


NOTES
1.
Gerald Fischer, American Banking Structure ( New York, 1968), pp. 42-53.
2.
U.S. Comptroller of the Currency, Annual Report, December 1, 1930 ( Washington, D.C., 1931), p. 1.
3.
U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, Annual Report June 30, 1931 ( Washington, D.C., 1932), pp. 34-35.
4.
U.S. House of Representatives, Banking and Currency Committee, 71st Congress, 2d Session, Branch, Chain and Group Banking, Hearings . . . under H.R. 141, 2 vols. ( Washington, D.C., 1930), I, p. 1537.
5.
U.S. Senate, Banking and Currency Committee, 72d Congress, 1st Session, Operations of the National and Federal Reserve Banking System, Hearings . . . on S4115, 2 pts. ( Washington, D.C., 1932), II, p. 298. (Hereafter referred to as U.S. Senate, Banking and Currency Committee, Hearings S4115.)
6.
U.S. Senate, Banking and Currency Subcommittee, 71st Congress, 3d Session, Operations of the National and Federal Reserve Banking Systems. Hearings Pursuant to S. Res. 71, 7 pts. ( Washington, D.C., 1931), II, p. 324. (Hereafter referred to as U.S. Senate, Banking and Currency Subcommittee, Hearings S. Res. 71.)
7.
U.S. Senate, Banking and Currency Committee, Hearings S.4115, II, p. 306.
10.
U.S. Senate, Banking and Currency Subcommittee, Hearings S. Res. 71, I, pp. 269-270.
12.
U.S. Senate, Banking and Currency Committee, Hearings S.4115, II, p. 356.

-74-

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The American Banking Community and New Deal Banking Reforms, 1933-1935
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contributions in Economics and Economic History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Bank Reform, Remedial Action, and the Democratic Party 1929-1932 3
  • Notes 27
  • 2 - The Crisis of March 1933 31
  • Notes 50
  • 3 - The Bankers' Views on Bank Reform 52
  • Notes 74
  • The Banking Act of 1933 and the Failure of the Opposition 77
  • Notes 93
  • 5 - The Roosevelt Banking Policy 97
  • Notes 113
  • 6 - The Period of Transition July 1933- December 1934 115
  • Notes 136
  • 7 - A New Deal Banking Bill: The Banking Act of 1935 139
  • Notes 175
  • 8 Conclusions 179
  • Notes 187
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 197
  • Ab0ut the Author 205
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