4
Dialogue and Race

Algis Mickunas


INTRODUCTION

By now, the debates, analyses, and descriptions of dialogue, and its major variations, cover one of the major theoretical trends of this century. At times these trends are confused--intertwined with various systems of dialectics. These trends and their theoretical issues have been analyzed by Martin Buber ( 1970), Mikhail Bakhtin ( 1981), Bernhard Waldenfels ( 1971), and Richard Grathoff ( 1983). These scholars have summarized the problematic of dialogical thinking and have provided excellent bibliographies. They also point out that dialogical thinking grounds all other ventures. Indeed, other writers posit dialogue as a fundamental theoretical-methodological problematic ( Egon, 1990).

Given this plethora of concerns with dialogue, it is imperative to decipher its "priority" over other modes of thinking, without reducing it to some specific interpretation, such as "lingualism," hermeneutics, semiotics, postmodern notions of discursive practices, sociological theses that posit the primacy of society over the individual, or even to claims that individuals possess some inherent drive to form communication with other individuals. These explanations have created various theoretical and ideological "others" who are supposedly oblivious of the true condition of their lives.

Yet what could not, and indeed in principle cannot, be excluded even by ideologies and theories is the presence of the other as a condition for reflection upon one's own positionality. This means that the limits of understanding and awareness are not offered within a given position. They require reflection from a different, an alternate domain that, even if not completely understood, indeed, even if rejected, compels recognition of the other. This suggests that dialogical thinking is granted even in cases of transcultural, transnational, transideological,

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Postmodernism and Race
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - The Spiders of Truth 1
  • References 14
  • 2 the Importance of Social Imagery for Race Relations 17
  • References 28
  • 3 - A Brief Archaeology of Intelligence 31
  • References 48
  • 4 - Dialogue and Race 51
  • Introduction 51
  • References 64
  • 5 - Symbolic Violence and Race 65
  • References 76
  • 6 - What is a "Japanese"? Culture, Diversity, and Social Harmony in Japan 79
  • References 100
  • 7 - Community Control, Base Communities, and Democracy 103
  • References 112
  • 8 - Racist Ontology, Inferiorization, and Assimilation 115
  • Introduction 115
  • Conclusion 125
  • Notes 125
  • Notes 126
  • 9 Analyzing Racial Ideology: Post-1980 America 129
  • Introduction 129
  • Conclusion 140
  • References 141
  • 10 - Neoconservatism and Freedom in Postmodern North American Culture 145
  • Introduction 145
  • Conclusion 158
  • Notes 159
  • Selected Bibliography 163
  • Name Index 177
  • Subject Index 183
  • About the Editor and Contributors 189
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