perspective, their rendition of pluralism does not assist in any way to liberate minorities from oppression. Furthermore, because they do not question dualism, their view of society still reflects an asymmetrical relationship.
3.
See West ( 1993d), p. 3. Clearly, West is talking about assimilationists who are willing to let minorities "fit in" as additions to the common culture, and liberal pluralists who see minorities as separate entities who are fighting solely for group interest.
4.
Although affirmative action programs are vital for minority progress, Cornel West contends that persons should view affirmative action neither as a major solution to poverty nor as a sufficient means to achieving equality. Nevertheless, it is important to support affirmative action programs since they serve to limit discriminatory practices against women and other minorities.
5.
See West ( 1993d), p. 5. According to West, "real weekly wages of all American workers since 1973 have declined nearly 20 percent, while at the same time wealth has been upwardly distributed."

REFERENCES

Barthes R. ( 1977) Image, Music, Text. New York: The Noonday Press.

Bell D. ( 1975) "Ethnicity and Social Change." In Ethnicity: Theory and Experience, edited by N. Glazer and Daniel P. Moynihan. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, pp. 141-174.

Bhabha H. ( 1994) The Location of Culture. New York: Routledge.

Deleuze G., and F. Guattari. ( 1983) On the Line. New York: Semiotext(e).

D'Souza D. ( 1991) Illiberal Education. New York: The Free Press.

Foucault M. ( 1979) "What Is an Author?" In Textual Strategies, edited by J. Harari. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, pp. 141-160.

Gates H. L., Jr. ( 1992) Loose Canons: Notes on the Culture Wars. New York: Oxford University Press.

Gilroy P. ( 1993a) The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

-----. ( 1993b) Small Acts. London: Serpent's Tail.

Goldberg D. T. ( 1993) Racist Culture: Philosophy and the Politics of Meaning. Cambridge: Blackwell Publishers.

Gordon M. ( 1964) Assimilation in American Life. New York: Oxford University Press.

Grossberg L. ( 1992) We Gotta Get Out of This Place. New York: Routledge.

Hacker A. ( 1995) "The Crackdown on African-Americans." The Nation, July 10, pp. 45-49.

Hall S. ( 1991) "Ethnicity: Identity and Difference." Radical America 23, no. 4: 9-20.

-----. ( 1992) "What Is This 'Black' in Black Popular Culture." In Black Popular Culture, edited by Gina Dent. Seattle: Bay Press, pp. 21-33.

Hansen M. L. ( 1952) "The Third Generation in America." Commentary 14 (November): 492-500.

Herrnstein R., and C. Murray. ( 1994) The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life. New York: The Free Press. hooks, b. ( 1990) Yearning. Boston: South End Press.

-----. ( 1992) Black Looks: Race and Representation. Boston: South End Press.

Kingston M. H. ( 1977) The Woman Warrior. New York: Vintage.

-126-

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Postmodernism and Race
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - The Spiders of Truth 1
  • References 14
  • 2 the Importance of Social Imagery for Race Relations 17
  • References 28
  • 3 - A Brief Archaeology of Intelligence 31
  • References 48
  • 4 - Dialogue and Race 51
  • Introduction 51
  • References 64
  • 5 - Symbolic Violence and Race 65
  • References 76
  • 6 - What is a "Japanese"? Culture, Diversity, and Social Harmony in Japan 79
  • References 100
  • 7 - Community Control, Base Communities, and Democracy 103
  • References 112
  • 8 - Racist Ontology, Inferiorization, and Assimilation 115
  • Introduction 115
  • Conclusion 125
  • Notes 125
  • Notes 126
  • 9 Analyzing Racial Ideology: Post-1980 America 129
  • Introduction 129
  • Conclusion 140
  • References 141
  • 10 - Neoconservatism and Freedom in Postmodern North American Culture 145
  • Introduction 145
  • Conclusion 158
  • Notes 159
  • Selected Bibliography 163
  • Name Index 177
  • Subject Index 183
  • About the Editor and Contributors 189
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