The Political Economy of Morocco

By I. William Zartman | Go to book overview

a generally low assessment of the state's performance. Using Almond and Verba's ( 1965, pp. 24-25) classification, Morocco's political culture might be termed subject-participant, where "a substantial part of the population has acquired specialized input orientations and an activist set of self-orientations, while most of the remainder of the population continues to be oriented toward an authoritarian government structure and have a relatively passive set of self-orientations." This cultural mix (somewhat similar to that in France) tends to produce governmental instability with "an alternation of authoritarian and democratic governments." As discussed above, those with participant orientations become frustrated and alienated from the system because they are denied opportunities for effective participation in government, but they continue to hold idealist aspirations. Over a long time period, the state's democratic machinery will come to be utilized in combination with populist ideology and appeal.


NOTES
1.
In 1983, social scientists from the West and the Arab world met to discuss this topic;See Tessler 1987. On doing research in Morocco, see Brown, Rollman and Waterbury 1970, and Miller 1973.
2.
A great deal has been written on political socialization and the role of the family in this process. See, in particular, Roberta S. Sigel, ed., Learning About Politics: A Reader in Political Socialization ( New York: Random House, 1970); Jack Dennis, ed., Socialization to Politics ( New York: John Wiley, 1973);and R. E. Dawson K. Prewitt and K. S. Dawson Political Socialization, 2nd ed. ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1977).
3.
The Moroccan elementary school curriculum normally includes a set number of hours every week for religion and Quranic recitation/memorization. Almost four hours a week (12.5 percent) are reserved for religious instruction in each grade level. See the publications concerning different grade levels entitled: Ahdaf wa-tawjihat Khassa ( Aims and Specific Instructions) ( Rabat: Ministry of National Education, Department of Elementary Instruction, 1983).

Schoolyards in Moroccan elementary schools are generally "decorated" with slogans and pronouncements intended for the edification of the students. Here are some examples of these "little sermons": "Cleanliness is a component of Faith," "Religion, to God, is Islam"; "Truth in word and deed is a Virtue"; "If you are grateful you will prosper"; "Be respectful and you will be respected"; and "The essence of wisdom is fear of God."

4.
Also, one study of Moroccan elementary school textbooks reported that the king, like the early caliphs, combines the legislative, judicial, and executive powers in his person.See "L'Orientation de Pensée du Maroc Actuel á. Travers les Manuels Scolaires en Langue Arabe," Maghreb 36 ( 1969): 36-41.

-116-

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The Political Economy of Morocco
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Abbreviations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - King Hassan's New Morocco 1
  • Notes 33
  • 2 - Makhzen Traditions and Administrative Channels 34
  • Notes 56
  • 3 - Political Parties and Power-Sharing 59
  • Notes 82
  • 4 - Religion in Polity and Society 84
  • Notes 96
  • 5 - Attitudes, Values, and the Political Process in Morocco 98
  • Notes 116
  • 6 - The Interface Between Family and State 117
  • Note 140
  • 7 - Recent Economic Trends: Managing the Indebtedness 141
  • Note 158
  • 8 - Morocco's Agricultural Crisis 159
  • 9 - Morocco's International Economic Relations 173
  • Notes 185
  • 10 - The Impact of the Saharan Dispute on Moroccan Foreign and Domestic Policy 188
  • 11 - Image and Reality in Moroccan Political Economy 212
  • References 243
  • Index 257
  • About the Contributors 263
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