The Political Economy of Morocco

By I. William Zartman | Go to book overview

6
THE INTERFACE BETWEEN FAMILY AND STATE

SAADIA SABAH

A dominant, often authoritarian state and an overgrown bureaucracy are general features of nearly all developing societies. The bureaucracy is generally viewed as an instrument of social and economic change. Its historical development and many roles are directly linked to the state and its evolution. The broad responsibilities assumed by the state in major areas of life give bureaucracy a particularly significant weight within the social system. Bureaucracy usually constitutes the largest and most effective part of a country's formal organization.

There has been relatively little theoretical analysis of the relationship between formal organizations and their social environment ( Crozier 1964). This is particularly true with respect to national bureaucracies, which, by their very nature, differ substantially from Western, profitoriented organizations. Modernization theory has largely determined the manner in which bureaucracy has been viewed and analyzed. It looks at bureaucracy as a new mode of organization that contrasts and frequently clashes with a society organized along different principles. A major theme is the tension, within systems and individuals, between "particularistic" beliefs, attachments, and relations on the one hand, and administrative requirements based on impersonal norms and procedures on the other. Society inevitably evolves toward a "modern" and bureaucratized social order.

This study explores the nature of the relationship between Moroccan bureaucracy and society from a different perspective. It is based on an ethnographic analysis of how families deal with the bureaucracy on an ongoing, daily basis. It suggests that informal mediation -- far from being

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The Political Economy of Morocco
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Abbreviations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - King Hassan's New Morocco 1
  • Notes 33
  • 2 - Makhzen Traditions and Administrative Channels 34
  • Notes 56
  • 3 - Political Parties and Power-Sharing 59
  • Notes 82
  • 4 - Religion in Polity and Society 84
  • Notes 96
  • 5 - Attitudes, Values, and the Political Process in Morocco 98
  • Notes 116
  • 6 - The Interface Between Family and State 117
  • Note 140
  • 7 - Recent Economic Trends: Managing the Indebtedness 141
  • Note 158
  • 8 - Morocco's Agricultural Crisis 159
  • 9 - Morocco's International Economic Relations 173
  • Notes 185
  • 10 - The Impact of the Saharan Dispute on Moroccan Foreign and Domestic Policy 188
  • 11 - Image and Reality in Moroccan Political Economy 212
  • References 243
  • Index 257
  • About the Contributors 263
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