The Political Economy of Morocco

By I. William Zartman | Go to book overview

11
IMAGE AND REALITY IN MOROCCAN POLITICAL ECONOMY
MARK A. TESSLER Morocco is a country that inspires both passionate praise and militant condemnation. This chapter reviews some of the generalizations that are frequently expressed in discussions of Moroccan political and economic life. The goal is to discourage stereotypic judgments and unidimensional analysis by providing both a foundation for informed discussion and a stimulus to further inquiry. In selecting issues on which to comment, I have employed two general guidelines. First, the matter should fall broadly within the domain of political economy and should be of significance to Americans seeking to learn about Morocco. Second, it should be a topic about which either strongly differing opinions are often expressed or about which overly simple conclusions are frequently drawn. In selecting topics, I have consulted a number of persons with interest in and knowledge about Morocco.The five propositions about Moroccan political economy that I shall consider are:
1. Morocco is an effective multiparty democracy, the only one in the Arab world.
2. King Hassan is remote from his people and rules as did the shah of Iran.
3. King Hassan provoked the war in the Sahara to divert public attention from domestic problems.
4. Morocco's recent union with Libya shows that King Hassan is not a true and reliable friend of the West.
5. Morocco is genuinely committed to peace between Israel and the Arab world.

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The Political Economy of Morocco
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Abbreviations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - King Hassan's New Morocco 1
  • Notes 33
  • 2 - Makhzen Traditions and Administrative Channels 34
  • Notes 56
  • 3 - Political Parties and Power-Sharing 59
  • Notes 82
  • 4 - Religion in Polity and Society 84
  • Notes 96
  • 5 - Attitudes, Values, and the Political Process in Morocco 98
  • Notes 116
  • 6 - The Interface Between Family and State 117
  • Note 140
  • 7 - Recent Economic Trends: Managing the Indebtedness 141
  • Note 158
  • 8 - Morocco's Agricultural Crisis 159
  • 9 - Morocco's International Economic Relations 173
  • Notes 185
  • 10 - The Impact of the Saharan Dispute on Moroccan Foreign and Domestic Policy 188
  • 11 - Image and Reality in Moroccan Political Economy 212
  • References 243
  • Index 257
  • About the Contributors 263
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