Encyclopedia of American Parties, Campaigns, and Elections

By William C. Binning; Larry E. Esterly et al. | Go to book overview

D

DALEY, RICHARD J. ( 1902-1976) served as mayor of Chicago and chairman of the Cook County Democratic Central Committee. Richard Daley was born in the Bridgeport section of Chicago. He worked in the stockyards while attending DePaul University Law School. He was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1933. He worked his way up in the local Democratic Party, and was elected chairman of the party in 1953. In 1955, he was elected mayor of Chicago. He retained both positions.

As a political leader, Daley was very influential in Illinois state politics and national politics. He is credited with John F. Kennedy's close victory in Illinois over Richard Nixon in the presidential election of 1960. At the 1968 Democratic National Convention, he was criticized for the treatment of protestors by the Chicago police. As mayor of Chicago, Daley was credited with good management, and the revitalization of the central business district. In a recent survey, he was recognized as one of best mayors in the United States. His son, Richard M. Daley, was elected mayor of Chicago in 1989.

Reference: Milton Rakove, Don't Make No Waves--Don't Back No Losers ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1975).

DARK HORSE. A dark horse candidate is not favored to win at the beginning of the nomination process. The dark horse candidate is nominated as a result of a compromise after the national convention delegates have deadlocked over the frontrunners. The first dark horse candidate nominated was James Polk of Tennessee at the Democratic Convention of 1844. He was selected after an impasse developed between the supporters of former president Martin Van Buren of New York and the supporters of Lewis Cass of Michigan. After eight ballots the

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Encyclopedia of American Parties, Campaigns, and Elections
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 35
  • D 71
  • E 91
  • F 167
  • G 185
  • H 201
  • I 219
  • J 227
  • K 243
  • L 249
  • M 265
  • N 287
  • O 299
  • P 303
  • Q 347
  • R 349
  • S 373
  • T 399
  • U 423
  • V 427
  • W 435
  • Y 449
  • Appendix - Presidents, Vice-Presidents, and Party Control of Congress, 1789-Present 451
  • Selected Bibliography 455
  • Index 459
  • About the Authors *
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