Catherine the Great: And Other Studies

By G. P. Gooch | Go to book overview

3
VOLTAIRE AS HISTORIAN

I. Charles XII and Peter the Great

VOLTAIRE, declared Gibbon, his neighbour at Lausanne, was the most extraordinary man of the century. The greatest figure in the literature of all ages, the most astonishing creation of the author of nature, the most representative of Frenchmen, echoed Goethe. Centuries would be needed to produce his equal, exclaimed Diderot. 'Ce n'est pas un homme, c'est un sièle,' exclaimed Victor Hugo. 'Le plus bel esprit de ce siècle,' was the verdict of President Hénault. Taine compared him to a fountain whose waters never ceased to play. No writer before or since has occupied such a commanding position in Europe or exercised such immediate and enduring influence. He possessed a larger clientéle during his lifetime than any man of letters before Bernard Shaw. French publications could count on readers all over Europe, since French was the lingua rança of the Intelligentsia in every land. Few foreigners could enjoy Hamlet or Faust in the original, and even in the best translations the magic disappeared. The attention of the world had been focused on French culture and the Ville Lumière by the galaxy of genius during the seventeenth century and by the immeasurable prestige of Le Roi Soleil. Of this accumulated capital Voltaire was a grateful beneficiary, and in the sixty years of his literary activity he contributed even more than he had received. Leaping into fame with his early plays and poems, he grew in stature and authority till he became the uncrowned king of the Republic of Letters. In addition to the Académie Française he was a member of the Royal Society and of the Academies of La Crusca, St Petersburg and Berlin. His acquaintance was craved by princes no less than by literary aspirants, and his letters passed like current

-199-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Catherine the Great: And Other Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • By the Same Author ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Plates xi
  • I - Catherine the Great 1
  • 2 - Four French Salons 109
  • 3 - Voltaire as Historian 199
  • 4 - Bismarck's Legacy 275
  • Index 290
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.