Morality in Accounting

By Ahmed Riahi-Belkaoui | Go to book overview

6
Truth in Accounting
The lack of concern in truth in accounting has always been a major issue in the accounting literature. Witness the following concern expressed by K. MacNeal in 1939:

For more than four hundred years since the publication of Paciok's book on double entry bookkeeping in 1454, accounting methods, and hence accounting reports, have been based on expediency rather than on truth. Financial statements today are composed of a bewildering mixture of accounting conventions, historical data, and present facts, wherein even accountants are often unable to distinguish between truth and fiction. 1

MacNeal may have been a little bit too hard on accountants, given the possibilities and impossibilities of truth in accounting. They are examined in this chapter, showing that the idea of truth in accounting is at best a normative idea that has few chances of being applied in accounting.
NOTIONS OF TRUTH IN PHILOSOPHY
Knowledge of a proposition arises from its truthfulness. If we know of a proposition, we know it to be true. The question becomes: What makes a proposition a true one? In everyday life we encounter states of affairs occurring or existing in the world that we report using language. A true proposition relates to a state of affairs that occurs. The truth relates to the reporting of the occurrence or the existence of a state of affairs. The truth may be framed differently. 2
It can be truth as correspondence when the proposition is true if it corresponds to a fact. The notion of correspondence is best explicated as follows:

-177-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Morality in Accounting
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Fairness as a Concept of Justice in Accounting 1
  • 2 - Ethics in Accounting 25
  • 3 - Examples of Ethical Issues and Cases 75
  • 4 - Honesty in the Accounting Environment 119
  • 5 - Accounting and Social Responsibility 149
  • 6 - Truth in Accounting 177
  • Conclusions 201
  • Notes 202
  • Bibliography 206
  • Index 209
  • About the Author 213
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 216

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.