The Rehabilitation of Virtue: Foundations of Moral Education

By Robert T. Sandin | Go to book overview

13
TOWARD A SPIRITUAL EDUCATION

The crisis of contemporary culture presents the need, as Parker Palmer says, for a recovery of an understanding of education as a process of spiritual formation. 1 An education that enables people to view themselves and their world in relation to transcendence prepares them to see beyond appearances to the hidden realities of life. It becomes the means for the discovery and possession of truth and freedom, of authenticity and spontaneity, of purpose and selfhood. Through the disciplines of spirituality we may be reformed into the ideal for which we are intended.

The goal of education so conceived is formation of a spiritual understanding free of all illusion. Its dynamic is a process of thinking about spirituality in its ideal concept and recognition of the disciplines that are required to achieve authenticity in the life of the spirit. Its guidelines are derived from the collective experience of those who have followed the paths of spiritual growth and have left clues concerning the reality that discloses itself to all who seek in truth.


TRUTH AND SPIRITUALITY

There are forms of spirituality that are built upon illusion. An authentic spirituality stems from an encounter with truth. The authenticity of faith is confirmed in such qualities as truth, consistency, love, consecration, simplicity, goodness, and hope. It is rooted in truth, in community, and in caring.

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The Rehabilitation of Virtue: Foundations of Moral Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • I - Values in Retreat 17
  • Summary 30
  • 2 - The Teaching of Values 31
  • 3 - Values Without Philosophy 43
  • 4 - The Anti-Intellectualism of the Schools 55
  • Summary 70
  • 5 - Values in Development 72
  • Summary 87
  • 6 - The Realm of Value 89
  • 7 - Utility and Value 110
  • Summary 124
  • 8 - Thinking and Valuing 126
  • 9 - Reasons for Being Moral 143
  • Summary 156
  • 10 - Education and Virtue 158
  • Summary 182
  • 11 - The Structure of Virtue 184
  • Summary 207
  • 12 - Spirituality Without Illusion 210
  • 13 - Toward a Spiritual Education 231
  • Summary 245
  • Notes 247
  • Selected Bibliography for Values Education 267
  • Index 279
  • About the Author 283
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