Voltaire and the Theatre of the Eighteenth Century

By Marvin Carlson | Go to book overview

Series Foreword

Lives of the Theatre is designed to provide scholarly introductions to important periods and movements in the history of world theatre from the earliest instances of recorded performance through to the twentieth century, viewing the theatre consistently through the lives of representative theatrical practitioners. Although many of the volumes will be centered upon playwrights, other important theatre people, such as actors and directors, will also be prominent in the series. The subjects have been chosen not simply for their individual importance, but because their lives in the theatre can well serve to provide a major perspective on the theatrical trends of their eras. They are therefore either representative of their time, figures whom their contemporaries recognized as vital presences in the theatre, or they are people whose work was to have a fundamental influence on the development of theatre, not only in their lifetimes but after their deaths as well. While the discussion of verbal and written scripts will inevitably be a central concern in any volume that is about an artist who wrote for the theatre, these scripts will always be considered in their function as a basis for performance.

The rubric Lives of the Theatre is therefore intended to suggest both biographies of people who created theatre as an institution and as a medium of performance and of the life of the theatre itself. This dual focus will be illustrated through the titles of the individual volumes, such as Christopher Marlowe and the Renaissance of Tragedy, George Bernard Shaw and the Socialist Theatre, and Richard Wagner and Festival Theatre, to name just a few. At the same time, although the focus of each volume will be different, depending on the particular subject, appropriate emphasis will be given to the cultural and political context within which the theatre of any given time

-xi-

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Voltaire and the Theatre of the Eighteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contents ix
  • Series Foreword xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • Chapter 1 Voltaire's Career Begins, 1694-1726 1
  • Notes 19
  • Chapter 2 Voltaire in England, 1726-1728 21
  • Notes 36
  • Chapter 3 Triumph in the Theatre, 1729-1743 39
  • Notes 57
  • Chapter 4 Voltaire at Court, 1743-1750 59
  • Notes 79
  • Chapter 5 Voltaire and Germany, 1750-1755 81
  • Notes 96
  • Chapter 6 Voltaire and the Philosophes, 1755-1760 97
  • Notes 118
  • Chapter 7 The Sage of Ferney, 1761-1769 121
  • Notes 138
  • Chapter 8 The Final Triumph, 1770-1778 141
  • Notes 155
  • Chapter 9 The Path to the Pantheon, 1778-1791 157
  • Notes 166
  • Chronology of Voltaire's Life 169
  • Further Reading 175
  • Index 179
  • About the Author 187
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