Managing Colleges and Universities: Issues for Leadership

By Allan M. Hoffman; Randal W. Summers | Go to book overview

education is sufficiently broad and encompassing. Have they escaped the myopia of the current market definition so they understand how market boundaries are shifting? Third, do they agree on the most important changes? Without such a consensus, a college or university can pursue a whole range of competing agendas, spend lots of money on competing objectives, and never get to the future first. Fourth, would their answer surprise competitors? Are they competitively unique? Finally, can an action plan be distilled from their answers? Do they know what they will do differently this year, next year, and so on? Many colleges have a vague concept of the long term, and a lot of specifics and budget pressure in the near term-but nothing in between. The linking actions that get institutions from the near to the long term are missing.

Many leaders think of the short and long term as separate agendas, but, in reality, they are closely interwoven. Institutions cannot get to the long term in one big jump. The goal should be to understand what relatively small things they have to do this year that will have enormous implications for the future. Can institutions point to the five or six innovations -- such as partnerships, or experiments with beneficiaries -- that hold great portent for the future? These innovations should attract a disproportionate amount of leaders' attention. This attention is where leaders can add real value that distinguishes the institution from its competitors.


REFERENCES AND SELECTED READINGS

Alfred Richard. 1995. Transforming Community Colleges to Compete for the Future. Ann Arbor, MI: Unpublished paper.

Argyris Chris. 1977. Double Loop Learning Organizations. Harvard Business Review (September-October): 115-124.

Bartlett Christopher and Ghoshal Sumatra. 1995. Changing the Role of Top Management: Beyond Systems to People. Harvard Business Review 73(3) (May- June): 132-143.

Case John. 1995. The Open-Book Revolution. Inc. (June): 26-43.

Collis David and Montgomery Cynthia. 1995. Competing on Resources: Strategy in the 1990's. Harvard Business Review 73(4) (July-August): 118-129.

Galbraith John. 1994. Competing with Flexible Lateral Organizations, 2nd ed. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley: 108-123.

Hamel Gary and Prahalad C. K. 1994. Competing for the Future. Boston: Harvard Business School: 220-231.

Nevis Edwin; DiBella Anthony; and Gould Janet. 1995. Understanding Organizations as Learning Systems. Sloan-Management Review (Winter): 73-85.

Nonaka 1. 1991. The Knowledge-Creating Company. Harvard Business Review 69(6): 96-104.

Peters Thomas J. & Waterman Robert H., Jr. 1982. In Search of Excellence: Lessons From America's Best Run Companies. New York: Harper & Row.

Prahalad C. K. and Hamel Gary. 1990. The Core Competence of the Corporation. Harvard Business Review (May-June): 79-91.

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