Managing Colleges and Universities: Issues for Leadership

By Allan M. Hoffman; Randal W. Summers | Go to book overview

ernor and student organizations. But in both states the process involves strong interplay between campus and state. Probably no other process includes, to a similar extent, involvement of such an extensive campus management team from all three administrative domains (academic, business, and student affairs) as well as external relations staff. All of these interact to varying degrees with, on the one hand, students and their organizations (and their families who have a strong vested interest in the process) and governing board as well as legislative and gubernatorial staff, on the other.

In few states does tuition setting occur within an established, formal policy framework. In most states the process is strongly affected by annual changes in such important elements as state revenue, legislative leadership, the political stance of elected officials (which can vary markedly between election year and nonelection year), and the ideological agenda of leadership on the governing board. In most years, the process largely follows tradition, but lacking a set policy framework, sudden and radical shifts can occur due to changed circumstances, especially when disastrous changes occur in the state revenue picture or in the political and economic ideology of state government.

University presidents and their supporting teams drawn from all areas of administration are in a continual state of assessing the impact of tuition changes from previous years, managing the current results of the last change, and are somewhere in the ongoing process of setting next year's tuition. And each succeeding year the campus management is likely to interact with yet another task force or commission comprised of many players charged with exploring yet another possible solution to what many observers have called "the tuition dilemma."


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors would like to express their gratitude for assistance throughout the development of this chapter to James H. Bley, Jon E. Keller, Cristie L. Norwood, and Elizabeth A. Sias. Bley and Keller are policy analysts with the Arizona Board of Regents staff; Norwood and Sias are graduate students in the Higher Education program at Arizona State University.


REFERENCES AND SELECTED READINGS

Arizona Board of Regents. 1994. Report of the Commission on Student Costs and Financial Assistance. Phoenix.

Arizona Students Association. 1994. Crafting a Managed Plan for Setting Tuition and Fees. Tempe.

Bowen Howard E. 1974. Financing Her Education. The Current State of the Debate: 11-31. In Kenneth E. Jones, ed., Exploring the Case for Low Tuitionin Public Higher Education

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