Managing Colleges and Universities: Issues for Leadership

By Allan M. Hoffman; Randal W. Summers | Go to book overview

student development as a philosophical foundation, the profession has continued to legitimize its existence at institutions across the nation. As postsecondary education has grown in popularity, the administration of student affairs programs has become increasingly complex.

Today, CSAOs and their teams regularly interact with students, manage resources, create policy, manage existing facilities and coordinate the construction of new ones, manage crises, and deal with social and educational change ( Barr 1993). Consequently, it is critical that they possess the necessary skills that will enable them to be successful leaders, managers, politicians, and educators. Silverman ( 1980, 12) stated the following:

Our uniqueness . . . rests on our ability to fashion significant educational environments, using the resources, values, norms, and opportunities of the variety of constituencies on our campuses. To the extent that we are successful in our innovative work, we will be respected, not because of position, but as a result of the impacts we have on campus life.

Today, CSAOs and practitioners alike must strive hard to make a difference in the lives of their students. They must work collectively and collaboratively with others on campus to provide the best living-learning experience possible. To do less is unacceptable.


REFERENCES

Ambler D. A. 1980. The Administrator Role: 159-174. In U. Delworth, G. R. Hanson and Associates, eds., Student Services: A Handbook for the Profession. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Ambler D. A. 1993. Developing Internal Management Structures: 107-120. In M. J. Barr, ed., The Handbook of Student Affairs Administration. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

American College Personnel Association Student Learning Project. 1994. The Student Learning Imperative: Implications for Student Affairs. Washington, DC: American College Personnel Association.

A merican Council on Education. 1937. The Student Personnel Point of View. American Council on Education Studies: Series 1, Vol. 1, No. 3. Washington, DC: Author.

Baier J. L. 1993. Technological Changes in Student Affairs Administration: 183- 196. In M. J. Barr, ed., The Handbook of Student Affairs Administration. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Barr M. J. 1988a. Managing the Enterprise: 5-20. In M. L. Upcraft and M. J. Barr , eds., Managing Student Affairs Effectively. New Directions for Student Services, No. 41. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Barr M. J. 1988b. Managing Important Others: 51-64. In M. L. Upcraft and

M. J. Barr, eds., Managing Student Affairs Effectively. New Directions for Student Services, No. 41. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Barr M. J. 1988c. Managing Money: 21-37. In M. L. Upcraft and M. J. Barr, eds.,

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